Scoliosis becomes less common

Adolescent scoliosis

Young people often worry when they get scoliosis - because it is precisely at this age that you want to belong and not “be different”. The often lengthy treatment, for example with an orthopedic corset, also raises many questions: Can I get along with the corset? What else can I wear now? How will others react to this?

The good news is that the limitations of the condition tend to have much less impact on friendships, hobbies, and leisure activities than you might think.

Above all, the changes in everyday life require time and patience. It often takes a few weeks, for example, to get used to wearing the corset and to get the necessary routine in handling it - or until it is possible to incorporate it into the daily routine.

With all the challenges that scoliosis brings, it is important to realize that it is a treatable condition and that it has a foreseeable end. Even in difficult times, it is often helpful to think about the positive things in your own life and stay optimistic: Most adolescents with scoliosis have a completely normal life ahead of them.

Exchanging ideas with people of the same age can also help to cope with scoliosis - for example in a self-help group on site or on the Internet.

It is important for parents to take their children's concerns seriously and to involve them in questions about treatment. Because when they understand their disease and treatment and know what to expect, it is usually easier for them to deal with it. Parents can also encourage their children to ask the doctor their questions. It helps to write down the questions beforehand so as not to forget them.