Are LGBT people socially recognized in Venezuela

According to the Pope on gay marriage | Venezuela dictator wants to have “marriage for all” tested

Is he really serious?

Venezuela's President Nicolás Maduro (57) said at an event with representatives of his ruling Socialist Party on October 22nd that he "has friends and acquaintances who are very happy with what the Pope (...) has said".

Maduro was referring to the Pope's remarks in the recently published documentary film "Francesco" by the gay director and producer Yevgeny Afineevsky (48), in which the head of the Roman Catholic Church spoke out for the first time in favor of registered civil partnerships for homosexuals.

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The words of Pope Francis (84) now apparently led Maduro to at least consider passing a law on marriage equality in Venezuela.

Because: The country’s president called on the country’s national assembly to “discuss” the law after the December 6 elections, during the next term, which begins in January. "I will leave this task, the task of LGBT marriage, to the next National Assembly," said Maduro.

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For Venezuela, with around 96 percent Roman Catholic population, that would be a minor sensation.

► If the project is successful, Venezuela would be the sixth country in South America after Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador and Uruguay to legalize marriage for everyone.

Location for LGBTQ in Venezuela

The statements come as a surprise, because the LGBTQ community is one of the most severely affected groups of people in the country's economic and humanitarian government crisis. Your rights are severely limited to this day.

So far, the constitutional amendment adopted in 1999 defines marriage as exclusively “between a man and a woman”. In addition, same-sex couples are not allowed to adopt children. And: The existing anti-discrimination laws in the workplace relate solely to sexual orientation, but not to a person's gender identity.

Even the so-called "homo-healing" is still legal in Venezuela!

The opposition parties, which currently hold the largest share of seats in the National Assembly, have already announced that they will be boycotting the parliamentary elections. Their fear: Maduro could manipulate the elections again in his favor.

The opening of marriage in the arch-Catholic country would actually be a milestone for human rights in Venezuela. Will it actually happen?

LGBTQ activists in the country are already very skeptical of the president's statements: "Maduro has already promised a lot," one of them told local media, "we'd rather wait than rejoice too early - and pray."

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