Can you eat too much shrimp

Delicious, creamy prawns, done right

Creamy prawns pure, without pasta

Well bought and properly prepared, these prawns are easy to lick with your fingers! Either as a starter with some bread, or with pasta as a main course.

Straight to the recipe

I like prawns. At least I think so. Because it is not so clear what the term “shrimp” includes. From the “party shrimp” to the “scampi” everything seems to belong to it. Or maybe not? We're getting to the bottom of that today.

The word has also got around that shrimp are often not bred in a healthy way. There is always talk of antibiotics and heavy metals. But there are alternatives. Even locals: German farmed shrimp! Who would have thought? They cost more, but are an absolute pleasure in every respect.

What are shrimp and what are not

The term “shrimp” is a generic term for all kinds of different crustaceans. Other trade names such as “Gambas” (Spanish), “Shrimps” or “Prawns” (both English) make things even more complicated. Dishonest restaurant owners like to offer “scampi” on their menu, but they actually serve something different. So what are the differences?

In a very simplified way, one can say that the term “shrimp” includes everything that does not have scissors. In contrast to crabs, lobsters, freshwater lobsters and scampi, shrimp do not have large claws on their forelegs. Because there are so many subspecies, one has probably agreed on the generic term "shrimp". By the way: the best known are called “Black Tiger” and “White Tiger”.

Raw, cooked, peeled or unpeeled

Granted, they look creepy. But the critters are sensitive. That is why we almost always sell them frozen. The "party prawns" are an exception. This is just a trade name that stands for shrimp that have already been cooked and packaged in a protective atmosphere on the refrigerated shelf. You can leave them there, because pre-cooked prawns are only good for salads, but not for cooking.

For all warm dishes, you should buy prawns that are still raw and preferably still in their shell. You can recognize them by the fact that they are not red. They are either gray / white, black mackerel, brownish or blue. Only when they come into contact with heat does their meat turn snow-white with a distinct red marbling. Everything that is already red when shopping is pre-cooked and not great for further cooking. (There are exceptions that are already raw reddish, this is then written on the packaging).

Whether you buy the prawns with their heads or already practically sliced ​​and deveined is a matter of taste and price. They really look a bit scary with their heads. The Ö. then always donate from the kitchen. But prepared as a whole, you get the best aroma in the end - and that's what attracts the Ö. then quickly back to the kitchen.

With organic you are on the safe side

Unfortunately, there is no obligation to label everything that is in shrimp. Wild catch is critical because there is a lot of by-catch. Aqua culture often means that the animals have properly bathed in antibiotics. Organic shrimp are an exception. Unfortunately, they are only very rarely available raw and with the skin on. I think that should change urgently! Another exception is: German farmed shrimp.

Fresh prawns from Germany

It's hard to believe, but shrimp farming is also on the rise in Germany. As far as I know, there are currently 2 companies that specialize in German shrimp: Cara Royal in Northern Germany and Crusta Nova in Munich. They guarantee that antibiotics are completely avoided in production.

The advantage of local production is obvious: the animals are not transported halfway around the globe. The distances are so short that the German shrimp are not even frozen. On the day the order is placed, they are still swimming in their pools and arrive at your home the next morning, chilled. It doesn't get any fresher. Allegedly, these prawns can even be eaten raw. However, I prefer to cook them gently.

Of course, these German prawns have their price. You have to put almost three times as much on the counter. That hurts at first. But hey, we're talking about climate change and that something has to change. Because it is not smart to buy goods from the other end of the world, I prefer to spend a little more and do it less often. That way, they remain something special. Because in terms of aroma and taste, the German prawns are simply top class!

German-bred prawns

How do I get the full aroma?

I already mentioned it: I recommend whole prawns. With head, shell and all the trimmings. You then have to peel them yourself and often devein too, but that is done quickly. You then use the heads and bowls to make a quick stock that chases the aroma of your dish through the ceiling!

If you prepare the recipe with frozen food, please let them thaw in the refrigerator as slowly as possible. If you have to go faster, put them next to each other in a plastic bag. Then let a lot of cold water into the sink, press the still open plastic bag under the water, so that the air is pushed out. Be careful not to let water get into the bag! Then close the bag under water with a clip so that it is watertight and airtight. Vacuumed in this way, you can also gently thaw the shrimp by swimming in cold water.

Since prawns are not cheap and ultimately how many prawns you serve per serving depends on your willingness to donate, I have omitted a specific amount in this recipe. The ingredients for the sauce are suitable for approx. 300-500g whole shrimp.

Recipe: Delicious creamy prawns done right

Creamy prawns with pasta

Ingredients (for 4 people / approx. 500g whole prawns)

For the fund:

The shells (and heads)
1-2 tbsp neutral oil, e.g. rapeseed oil
100ml white wormwood (Noilly Prat) (*)
150ml white wine
1 bay leaf
1-2 sprigs of fresh thyme
1 teaspoon light Miso paste (*) (optional)

For the creamy prawns:

The peeled prawns
2 teaspoons of salt
1 teaspoon of sugar
2 tbsp olive oil
1 clove of garlic
2-3 slices of pickled lemon or lemon zest
Juice of ½ lemon
the shrimp stock
2 tbsp very cold butter
2 stalks of flat leaf parsley
Salt and freshly ground white pepper as per feel

Also:

500g pasta, e.g. linguine or toasted white bread
Salt for cooking pasta

Preparation:

  1. The first thing to do is to peel the prawns. To do this, turn your head boldly and put it to one side. Use scissors to cut the back of the shrimp up to the tail fin. The intestine is exposed. Use a small knife to pull out the bowel and dispose of it. If necessary, clean the shrimp with a little paper towel.
  2. Dissolve 2 teaspoons of salt and 1 teaspoon of sugar in approx. 250ml of water in a bowl. Put the peeled prawns in it and leave to marinate in the refrigerator for 15-20 minutes.

For the fund:

  1. Heat an uncoated pan very hot. If you only have coated pans, you should use a large saucepan from which the steam can easily be drawn off. Heat 1-2 tablespoons of neutral oil and fry the shells and heads of the shrimp for 2-3 minutes until a dark sediment forms. Then pull the pan off the stove and deglaze with the wormwood and white wine. Scrape off the sediment with a wooden spatula. If the excited bubbling settles, pull the pan back on the stove, but only on a mild heat.
  2. Now add the bay leaf, thyme and possibly 1 teaspoon of light miso paste to the brew. The miso paste is optional. It gives the brew even more depth without putting itself in the foreground. Simmer uncovered for approx. 5 minutes over a very gentle heat. Then pass the pods through a fine sieve and collect the brew. Express the peel well!

For the pasta:

  1. For the pasta, put on a large pot of water (at least 4 liters) and bring to the boil. Add 1 handful of salt and cook the pasta according to the instructions on the packet.

For the creamy prawns:

  1. For the prawns, wipe out the pan and heat the olive oil in it over medium heat. Peel the garlic, chop it finely and sauté it gently in the pan for 1-2 minutes without it turning any color. Finely chop the lemon slices and sauté briefly in the pan. Then deglaze with the lemon juice and add the shrimp stock. Bring everything to the boil gently.
  2. Remove the prawns from the marinade and drain well. Place them side by side in the pan so that they don't overlap and let them cook gently for about 2 minutes with the lid closed. Then turn the prawns and cook for another minute with the lid closed. Carefully lift the prawns out of the pan and keep warm.
  3. Put the brew from the pan in a blender jar and mix with the Magic wand (*) mix well. Then gradually mix in the ice-cold butter in cubes until the sauce has a nice bond.
  4. Return the prawns with the sauce to the pan and keep them warm. Under no circumstances let it boil anymore, otherwise the shrimp will get dry and the sauce will lose its bond! Sprinkle with the chopped parsley and season with salt and freshly ground white pepper. Black pepper works too, but makes dark spots in the light sauce.
  5. Serve the prawns with some toasted bread as a starter in small bowls. Or remove one or two ladles from the pasta water and keep it. Sieve the pasta and mix quickly with the prawns. If the pasta soaks up too much sauce, add some of the pasta water you saved so that the pasta stays nice and moist. Serve quickly!

The first time I tried I let the stock boil down a little more. The result was an even creamier sauce. You should definitely do the same for the starter variant!

Practical kitchen helpers for this recipe (*):


The ones with asterisks (*) marked references are commission links. If you click on such a link and buy something, I get a small commission for it. For you the price doesn't change. I also don't see what you're buying. (Why advertising?)

And here is the recipe to print out again:

Delicious, creamy prawns, done right
Well bought and properly prepared, these prawns are easy to lick with your fingers! Either as a starter with some bread, or with pasta as a main course.
  • For the prawn stock:
  • The shells (and heads)
  • 1-2 tbsp neutral oil, e.g. rapeseed oil
  • 100ml white vermouth (Noilly Prat)
  • 150ml white wine
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1-2 sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 1 tsp light miso paste (optional)
  • For the creamy prawns:
  • The peeled prawns
  • 2 teaspoons of salt
  • 1 teaspoon of sugar
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 2-3 slices of pickled lemon or lemon zest
  • Juice of ½ lemon
  • the shrimp stock
  • 2 tbsp very cold butter
  • 2 stalks of flat leaf parsley
  • Salt and freshly ground white pepper as per feel
  • Also:
  • 500g pasta, e.g. linguine
  • Salt for cooking pasta
  1. The first thing to do is to peel the prawns. To do this, turn your head boldly and put it to one side. Use scissors to cut the back of the shrimp up to the tail fin. The intestine is exposed. Use a small knife to pull out the bowel and dispose of it. If necessary, clean the shrimp with a little paper towel.
  2. Dissolve 2 teaspoons of salt and 1 teaspoon of sugar in approx. 250ml of water in a bowl. Put the peeled prawns in it and leave to marinate in the refrigerator for 15-20 minutes.
  3. Heat an uncoated pan very hot. If you only have coated pans, you should use a large saucepan from which the steam can easily be drawn off. Heat 1-2 tablespoons of neutral oil and fry the shells and heads of the shrimp for 2-3 minutes until a dark sediment forms. Then pull the pan off the stove and deglaze with the wormwood and white wine. Scrape off the sediment with a wooden spatula. If the excited bubbling settles, pull the pan back on the stove, but only on a mild heat.
  4. Now add the bay leaf, thyme and possibly 1 teaspoon of light miso paste to the brew. The miso paste is optional. It gives the brew even more depth without putting itself in the foreground. Simmer uncovered for approx. 5 minutes over a very gentle heat. Then pass the pods through a fine sieve and collect the brew. Express the peel well!
  5. For the pasta, put on a large pot of water (at least 4 liters) and bring to the boil. Add 1 handful of salt and cook the pasta according to the instructions on the packet.
  6. For the prawns, wipe out the pan and heat the olive oil in it over medium heat. Peel the garlic, chop it finely and sauté it gently in the pan for 1-2 minutes without it turning any color. Finely chop the lemon slices and sauté briefly in the pan. Then deglaze with the lemon juice and add the shrimp stock. Bring everything to the boil gently.
  7. Remove the prawns from the marinade and drain well. Place them side by side in the pan so that they don't overlap and let them cook gently for about 2 minutes with the lid closed. Then turn the prawns and cook for another minute with the lid closed. Carefully lift the prawns out of the pan and keep warm.
  8. Put the brew from the pan in a blender jar and mix well with the hand blender. Then gradually mix in the ice-cold butter in cubes until the sauce has a nice bond.
  9. Return the prawns with the sauce to the pan and keep them warm. Under no circumstances let it boil anymore, otherwise the shrimp will get dry and the sauce will lose its bond! Sprinkle with the chopped parsley and season with salt and freshly ground white pepper. Black pepper works too, but makes dark spots in the light sauce.
  10. Serve the prawns with some toasted bread as a starter in small bowls. Or remove one or two ladles from the pasta water and keep it. Sieve the pasta and mix quickly with the prawns. If the pasta soaks up too much sauce, add some of the pasta water you saved so that the pasta stays nice and moist. Serve quickly!

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Category: All recipes, fish, main dishes, Italian recipes, pasta, recipe homepage, startersTags: Fond, light, seafood, recipe, quick