Where does the word Minacious come from?

New articles in the etymology portal 2005

´´ ~ `` (o o) -------. OooO - (_) - Oooo .--------


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  • Month-1-



    ... I work in a kindergarten and we will soon have the topic of Indians and I wanted to know which words from the German language are of Indian origin. I've already found one, e.g. "muk" from the inuit language and means "silence" ... - Thank you very much - Björn

    Search terms and new words of the week
    2004-12-24 - 2005-01-02


    • academy
    • America in So Many Words - Barnhart
    • America
    • American Languages, Words from (krysstal)
    • America
    • amerindian words in English (zompist)
    • on
    • To be on the quivive (blu)
    • - on honor and conscience
    • Barnhart - America in So Many Words
    • Barnhart - Words That Have Shaped America
    • benison (ref)
    • Bloover - the Viking with the vacuum cleaner
    • Bluejacker
    • brackish (ref)
    • Brand Names (wsu)
    • - book
    • Bug
    • Bug (abc)
    • bug (ety)
    • Bug (wor)
    • - Bow, bow of the ship
    • Canada
    • Canadian Society for the Study of Names (gc)
    • chicken in every pot
    • cooper
    • cornucopia (ref)
    • crispin (wsm)
    • Darwinian (wsm)
    • - decadent
    • dingbat
    • - interpreting
    • dotty (owa)
    • Eel River
    • egg
    • -egg
    • Egg, eggs (f-r)
    • - eiger
    • - get hold of it
    • - erratic
    • etiolate (ref)
    • Etymological Dictionary (FR) (Uni Tennessee)
    • exegesis (ref)
    • fuck
    • Fort Wayne
    • fox
    • French Etymology @ Globe-Gate (Uni Tennessee)
    • - rejoice
    • Fox
    • foxes
    • gallup poll (wsm)
    • Gary Cooper
    • Gary
    • GAU
    • gau
    • GAU
    • gau (ety)
    • - dormer
    • given
    • Geographical Names Data Base (gc)
    • Goldwynism (wsm)
    • Guide to sailing terms (palni)
    • Haiti
    • hoover - to hoover
    • Hoover Dam
    • Hooverville
    • Hunt Construction Group
    • IN
    • Indiana for Sail - Seaterms (palni)
    • Indiana University
    • Indiana, Robert
    • Indiana
    • Indianapolis
    • Indianapolis start
    • - Industry
    • industry (ety)
    • Israel
    • jaganaud
    • Canada
    • Kokomo
    • - Laugh
    • Laugh, smile (f-r)
    • - tinsel
    • Tinsel (nex)
    • languid (ref)
    • - learn
    • let's knuckle down (owa)
    • Wednesday
    • moil (ref)
    • Monday
    • Monday
    • Monday (pri)
    • Monday (pri)
    • mots anglais amér Indienne (zompist)
    • New world
    • - or
    • on a par with (owa)
    • opulence (ety)
    • oxymoron (owa)
    • - deposit
    • - pancakes
    • - Platea
    • punctilious (ref)
    • raillery (ref)
    • Railroad City
    • Rasputin (wsm)
    • religion
    • religion (ety)
    • religion stock (wsp)
    • renard
    • reprobate (wsm)
    • Sailing terms guide (palni)
    • Santa Claus legend (snopes)
    • - Rail - nail an egg onto the rail
    • - Rail - nail one to the rail
    • Rail (f-r)
    • Jewellery
    • jewelry (ety)
    • Jewelry
    • - mother-in-law
    • Seaterms - Indiana for Sail (palni)
    • - therapy
    • therapy (ety)
    • therapy generation (wsp)
    • vixen
    • - in front
    • wassail (owa)
    • Christmas
    • Christmas
    • Christmas in some languages ​​(lexilogos)
    • Christmas international (duden)
    • Christmas tree (symbol)
    • Christmas bonus
    • Christmas Island
    • Words from American Languages ​​(krysstal)
    • Words That Have Shaped America - Barnhart
    • Xmas
    • X-mas

    Search terms and new terms of the week
    2005-01-02 - 2005-01-09


    • A Modern Herbal (botanical)
    • Akkad
    • Akkadian language
    • - ambet
    • Americanisms, Dictionary of (merrycoz)
    • - anaglyph
    • - archicortex
    • Arnold's law
    • - ass
    • ASS
    • ass (ety)
    • ass (tak)
    • - deliver
    • - by heart
    • - bernburg
    • Bed trays
    • - bitch
    • bitch (ety)
    • bitch (tak)
    • blockbuster
    • blockbuster (owa)
    • Blockbuster (wde)
    • Blockbuster (wor)
    • Blockbuster (WWW)
    • Bloover - the Viking with the vacuum cleaner
    • Boolean algebra
    • - borbet
    • bosh (wsm)
    • loaf
    • bread and games
    • Bread and games (blu)
    • Bread names (diebackstube)
    • Peace of bread
    • chaparral (wsm)
    • coing
    • conjunction
    • conjunctive
    • consommer
    • Dandelion Beer
    • Dandelion Coffee
    • Dandelion Wine
    • dandelion
    • dant - * dant
    • De Morgan's Laws
    • - demon
    • demon (ety)
    • Dens leonis
    • dent- - * dent-
    • dent de lion
    • dent
    • dental
    • dentist
    • Dictionary of Americanisms (merrycoz)
    • - dike
    • dike (ety)
    • disjunction
    • Disjunction
    • distrait (ref)
    • - Village
    • Duden
    • Dunedin
    • eat
    • corner
    • ed- - * ed-
    • edge
    • - A
    • - memory
    • - Replacement
    • replacement (ref)
    • replacement (ety)
    • replacement (wsm)
    • Europe
    • Europe (blu)
    • Europe (f-r)
    • Europe - Old Europe - Word of the Year 2003
    • - experiment
    • experiment (ety)
    • Formal logic
    • - freer
    • Free State Bottleneck
    • - frommenwiler
    • galumph (ref)
    • - Business
    • Business
    • - poison
    • - poison
    • gift (ety)
    • Poison
    • Poison - you can take poison on it
    • - godiva
    • Godiva (ety)
    • - golden
    • Golden Horde
    • Horror
    • - good one
    • - good one
    • - pike soup
    • Pike soup (nex)
    • Pike soup - it draws like pike soup
    • Herb & Plant Index (botanical)
    • Herbal, A Modern (botanical)
    • - today
    • today (f-r)
    • Hilbert's problems
    • hoover - to hoover
    • indent
    • indentured servant
    • indentured
    • indentures
    • jazz
    • jazz (ety)
    • Jazz (wor)
    • jazz revisited (tak)
    • Jehovah
    • Jehovah (ety)
    • - barely
    • Leontodon
    • logic
    • logic
    • lubricious (ref)
    • - do
    • - masturbation
    • masturbation (ety)
    • Mathematic signs (Stanford)
    • Mathematical logic
    • Modern Legends - Linguistic (time)
    • Möbius tape
    • Morgan le Fay
    • Morgan's Laws
    • mosque
    • Mosque
    • mosquito
    • nark (wsm)
    • New spelling (duden)
    • Newsletter - Word of the Day (alphadic.)
    • oblation (ref)
    • - pagoda
    • peri (wsm)
    • pinguid (wsm)
    • pisslit
    • Plant & Herb Index (botanical)
    • Priest's Crown
    • Procrustean bed
    • Procrustes bed (blu)
    • quince
    • quince
    • - jam-packed
    • - Advice
    • Spelling Tips (duden)
    • Spelling history (duden)
    • rejoinder (ref)
    • unruly (wsm)
    • revamp
    • riposte (ref)
    • - red
    • red
    • red (ety)
    • red (f-r)
    • Red (nex)
    • Ruhr area language (Ruhr area language)
    • Russell's paradox
    • Russell's antimony
    • - slip
    • Slip (f-r)
    • Slide - the first slide, in one fell swoop
    • Rutsch - Happy New Year (w-a)
    • Happy New Year
    • - slaughter
    • Butcher
    • Goo
    • Goo
    • - grease
    • - cut
    • Cut, incision (f-r)
    • sedition (ref)
    • skookum (wsm)
    • Linguistic - modern legends (time)
    • Stigler's law of eponymy
    • - studs
    • Stollen (f-r)
    • Symbolic logic
    • tang
    • - baptism
    • tenacious
    • - thrombosis
    • thrombosis (ety)
    • tintin abulation (ref)
    • death
    • Death
    • Death (noun)
    • Death (nex)
    • Death - laughing yourself to death
    • tongs
    • tooth
    • tooth
    • tough
    • transmute (ref)
    • Trento
    • trident
    • Tridentine
    • Tridentine Creed
    • Tridism
    • Trent
    • - tricky
    • tusk
    • vacation
    • Vacation (f-r)
    • Vacation (w-a)
    • Vacation (wis)
    • vamp
    • vamp
    • vamp
    • vampire
    • Vampire Records
    • Vampire Slayer
    • vampire state
    • vampire tap
    • vampire time
    • Vampires
    • Vampire bats
    • Vampus, Crassus
    • Vampire
    • vituperation (ref)
    • Whitehead's law
    • Word Stories - Newsletter (duden)
    • wroth (wsm)
    • tooth
    • Zeno's paradox

    • A new entry was posted in the forum forum at http://www.etymologie.info/.
      A new post was posted in the forum:
      Subject: RE: Meaning of the days of the week Monday and Wednesday
      Content: Hello, In the etym. Duden found an explanation that applies to all days of the week under "Tuesday": "The names of our days of the week are loan translations. The originally Babylonian seven-day week had found its way into the Romans and Greeks, partly through the mediation of the Jews, with the days of the week after the gods of the seven ancient ones Planets were named ("Sun", "Moon", "Mars", "Mercury", "Jupiter", "Venus", "Saturn"). , "Monday", "Lundi", "Lunedí"; "Mardi", "Martedi"; "Mercredi", "Mercoledí"; "Jeudi", "Giovedí"; "Vendredi", "Venerdí"; "Saturday", " Saturday "," Samedí "). The Teutons got to know these names in the 4th century and changed them with the names of the corresponding German gods.
      Kind regards, EDo. PS .: I wish everyone here a good year with many good days of the week !!
    • A new entry was posted in the forum forum from http://www.etymologie.info/.
      A new post was posted in the forum:
      Subject: RE: rare combination
      Content: Hello, the combination of the consonants "wr" occurs in High German, as far as I know, only in two words, namely in "wringen" and "wrack". (Much more common in Low German, Dutch and English.) Then "wr" is probably in the H.d. has become "fr"?
      Kind regards, EDo.
    • A new entry was posted in the forum forum from http://www.etymologie.info/.
      A new post was posted in the forum:
      Subject: kangaroo
      Content: I have come across the following claim. Does anyone know if that's true? "Kangaroo" is Aboriginal language and means "I don't know"! This was the answer to the question of the first to know the name of this unusual animal.
      Regards Nik
    • ... for the purpose of an article I am looking for the genesis of the word "coach potatoe". Can someone help me there? Would be great. Thanks in advance and greetings, Michaela Krüger.
    • I came across your website by chance and I also asked how the terms "should and have" and "active and passive" appear in the accounting. why didn't you take apples and pears instead of should and have? ... Sahin


    Search terms and new words of the week
    2005-01-09 - 2005-01-16


    • Assets and liabilities
    • - alcohol
    • alcohol (ety)
    • Alcohol (you)
    • American ?, Do You Speak (pbs)
    • Amerindian words in English (zompist)
    • amiright
    • - auser rand and ribbon
    • Band names (amiright)
    • - Belvedere
    • best boy (wsm)
    • stupid
    • stupid (e) (f-r)
    • Boob Tuber
    • - bossusla
    • loaf
    • bread and games
    • Bread and games (blu)
    • Bread names (diebackstube)
    • Peace of bread
    • Buffalo (City)
    • Buffalo Creek
    • Captain Kangaroo
    • Co - and Co
    • cosmopolite (ref)
    • Couch Potato
    • CYA (owa)
    • Dictionary of the vulgar tongue - Francis, G.
    • dilly-dally (owa)
    • Dinkum
    • Do You Speak American? (pbs)
    • - inside
    • eldritch (ref)
    • Eponym (you)
    • Fanfaronade (you)
    • - Fish
    • foley (wsm)
    • Francis, G. - Dictionary of the vulgar tongue
    • Francis, G. - Slang Dictionary
    • - fox
    • gawker (wsm)
    • - genus
    • hot
    • hot
    • - poison
    • - poison
    • gift (ety)
    • Poison
    • Poison - you can take poison on it
    • gingerly (owa)
    • God
    • God (f-r)
    • God - help yourself, so God will help you (w-a)
    • God in France - Live like God in France
    • grip (wsm)
    • - grotto
    • - good
    • high school
    • high school
    • high school (ety)
    • gymnasium (mww)>
    • high school (wsm)
    • Pike soup - it draws like pike soup
    • Pike soup (nex)
    • Hindi-English jumble (csmonitor)
    • impervious (ref)
    • indurate (ref)
    • insulin (ety)
    • - insulin
    • jackeroo
    • kangaroo
    • Kangaroo
    • Kangaroo Island
    • Kangaroo care
    • kangaroo closure
    • kangaroo code
    • Kangaroo court
    • Kangaroo Island
    • Kangaroo Jack
    • Kangaroo Point
    • Kangaroo Records
    • Kangaroo Valley
    • kangaroo words
    • kangaroo
    • KangaROOS
    • KanguruDisk
    • - knight
    • knight (ety)
    • Knight (wor)
    • communication
    • communication
    • communication
    • - war
    • War
    • War of the future
    • war and peace
    • - Obtain
    • letterboxing
    • Manky (you)
    • Masticate (you)
    • - mayer
    • - horseradish
    • human
    • human
    • human (ety)
    • Human (nex)
    • human (wsm)
    • Human (you)
    • Misheared Lyrics (amiright)
    • multicultural
    • - neutral
    • neutral (ety)
    • - Not
    • Ossuary (you)
    • pass the buck (owa)
    • Peckish (you)
    • - Pizza
    • pizza (ety)
    • Pizza (f-r)
    • pizza (tak)
    • Pizza capicciosa (IT)
    • Pizza Margherita (IT)
    • Pizza Margherita
    • potato
    • pp.
    • pp
    • coup (ref)
    • quagmire (ref)
    • - scratch *
    • - slip
    • Slip (f-r)
    • Slide - the first slide, in one slide
    • Rutsch - Happy New Year (w-a)
    • Happy New Year
    • - blessed
    • - Senior
    • senior (ety)
    • senior moment (wsp)
    • slake (ref)
    • Slang Dictionary - Francis, G.
    • Should and have
    • - Spanish
    • Spanish, it seems to me
    • - plugged
    • - Floor
    • - floor
    • stock (ety)
    • stock (tak)
    • stock lock (wsp)
    • stock still (tak)
    • stuntman (wsm)
    • - tales
    • Perpetrator dead
    • the ball is in his court (owa)
    • - toi
    • TOI Toi Toi
    • toi-toi-toi (blu)
    • - trui
    • Tsunami
    • Tuber
    • Twee Buffels
    • - and
    • - vegan
    • vegan (ety)
    • - reason
    • Reason, sensible (f-r)
    • - vigil
    • vigil (ety)
    • true
    • - perceive
    • Wangganguru - a language of Australia
    • Days of the week
    • Word of the Year (slate)
    • To take literally (rhetoric)
    • wr-
    • - wurt
    • newspaper
    • Newspaper (f-r)
    • Zweibrücken

    Search terms and new terms of the week
    2005-01-16 - 2005-01-23


    • 3COM
    • a dog and pony act (owa)
    • All the aromas of Arabia
    • apogee (ref)
    • baked potato
    • bibulous (ref)
    • Centum languages
    • crisps
    • Dakota
    • Dakota Language (ethnologue)
    • Dakota Language (inext)
    • Dakota Language Homepage (alliance2k)
    • Dakota River
    • Dictionary of Symbols - Liungman
    • Dictionary of symbols (symbols)
    • Gemstone lexicon (beyars)
    • English in North Dakota (wikipedia)
    • English in South Dakota (wikipedia)
    • Folksonomy
    • french - to french
    • French fried potatoes
    • French Frieds
    • French fries
    • Fries - Would you like fries with that?
    • Frieze
    • go down the tubes (owa)
    • Histoires des Inventions (eurekaweb)
    • Honold - around the world with Germany
    • hot potato routing
    • hot potato
    • hubris (ref)
    • Insouciant (you)
    • Inventions ont une histoire ... (eurekaweb)
    • cash register
    • Kentum languages
    • Art lexicon by P. W. Hartmann (beyars)
    • Lakhota Language (inext)
    • Brand Name Lexicon (focus)
    • Liungman - Dictionary of Symbols
    • Liungman symbol
    • Liungman - Western Signs and Ideograms
    • Logo stories (brand dictionary)
    • Madrid Agreement
    • Brands as generic terms (ermel)
    • Brand Lexicon (brand Lexicon)
    • Brand logos (brand lexicon)
    • Brand Museum (brand museum)
    • Brand name lexicon (focus)
    • Brand slogans (brand lexicon)
    • Around the world with Germany - Honold
    • mouse potato
    • Names etymological dict. (thinkbabynames)
    • ND
    • North Central English (wikipedia)
    • North Dakota Nicknames (magazinusa)
    • North Dakota
    • odium (wsm)
    • Pasteur
    • pasteurize
    • pasteurize
    • Personal brands (brand dictionary)
    • Poor Man's Copyright
    • potatory
    • presentism (wsm)
    • Product brands (brand dictionary)
    • profuse (ref)
    • purloin (owa)
    • Red Bull
    • Riggs - First alphabet for Sioux
    • Jewelry lexicon (beyars)
    • Font (weikopf)
    • SD
    • Signs and Ideograms, Western - Liungman
    • Sioux
    • South Dakota Nickname (magazinusa)
    • South Dakota
    • - fall
    • - support
    • Sunkan Wakan
    • symbol
    • symbol
    • Symbol stories
    • Symbol histories (symbols)
    • Symbol lexicon (symbols)
    • Symbols - Liungman
    • Unword - Is unword an unword
    • Bad word of the year
    • voluble (ref)
    • Western Signs and Ideograms - Liungman

    • I know what the word Holocaust means, but can you tell me where it is linguistically derived?
      Thank you in advance.
      With best regards
      A. Gardziella
    • ... what originally means "to put your light under the bushel !?
      Thank you very much
      gebhard zupan
    • You mistakenly attribute “parry” to the Latin word “parare” - “to prepare”. This applies to “be ready” - “be ready”, but not to “parieren”, which is derived from the Latin verb “parére” - “obey”.
      Sincerely
      Beate Hetterich


    Search terms and new words of the week
    2005-01-23 - 2005-01-30


    • - shudder
    • Achilles heel
    • Achilles heel (blu)
    • Achilles heel (pri)
    • Achilles heel (w-a)
    • airy-fairy (wsm)
    • - acquisition
    • Animal Names, About (University of Michigan)
    • animus (wsm)
    • answer
    • answer
    • answer
    • Answer 42
    • Answer (s) (f-r)
    • - apertus
    • apparatus
    • archimedean point
    • archive
    • Bactériologie vétérinaire Dict. (bacterio)
    • ball
    • ball (ety)
    • Ball (f-r)
    • Ball (dance event)
    • Ball of Wax (wde)
    • Ball removal (tak)
    • Banished Words of the Year (lssu)
    • Beaver
    • Becker
    • - bury
    • pray noire (ref)
    • beaver
    • - bigot
    • bigot (ety)
    • bigot (owa)
    • bigot (wsm)
    • Bigot (you)
    • - blow
    • block
    • blockade
    • Log cabin
    • To block
    • - brothel (wooden hut)
    • - crackling
    • cachet (owa)
    • Castor canadensis
    • Castor Oil
    • Castor Oil Plant
    • Castor
    • Castor
    • Castoreum
    • Castoria
    • Castorius
    • Castor transports
    • coruscate (ref)
    • Dictionnaire de bactériologie v. (bacterio)
    • digitus
    • Dioscuri
    • diriment (wsm)
    • dwell (ety)
    • - dwelling
    • Dwellings (tak)
    • - ebay
    • Encyclopedia (Tloen Encyclopedia)
    • - ergonomics
    • - upbringing
    • evince (ref)
    • - technical term
    • fallacious (owa)
    • - fart
    • fart (ety)
    • fart (tak)
    • fart (tak)
    • Flew
    • forlorn (ref)
    • - walk
    • Walking (f-r)
    • - common
    • Gemini
    • - shaken mass
    • - face
    • Face, (f-r)
    • Gravitas (you)
    • House
    • House - excited
    • holocaust
    • holocaust (ety)
    • holus bolus (wsm)
    • hubble-bubble (wsm)
    • - Jason
    • - is
    • JPEG
    • Canada
    • Canada
    • Castor and Polydeikes
    • pebbles
    • Extras
    • Leda
    • - corpses
    • Linguists discover the Internet (economist)
    • Linguist's Search Engine (umd)
    • lotto
    • lotto
    • lotto (ety)
    • - Mandorla
    • manual
    • manual
    • manual (ety)
    • manual automatic doors (tak)
    • manual babbling (wsp)
    • moiety (ref)
    • niminy-piminy (wsm)
    • Obtund (you)
    • - ears
    • Ears - have a fist behind your ears
    • Ears - wet behind the ears
    • Ears - write something behind your ears
    • omnipresent (ref)
    • Ouija (you)
    • ouija board (owa)
    • para
    • parade
    • paradox
    • parallel
    • ready
    • parry
    • perfunctory (ref)
    • horse
    • Horse - The horse does not eat cucumber salad
    • Horse - Tell someone about the horse
    • Horse - You have seen horses throw up
    • Horse - Trojan horse
    • Horse - tell about the horse (nex)
    • plaintiff (owa)
    • plimsoll line (owa)
    • police
    • Polydeics
    • Polydeukes
    • - potash
    • psychology
    • Psychology - Books (DE)
    • Psychology (blu)
    • repair
    • riprap (wsm)
    • - rotate
    • - glory sheet
    • Salmagundi (you)
    • - sauerland
    • Bushel - put his light under the bushel
    • fate
    • Fate
    • - Schorn
    • seminar
    • seminar (ety)
    • - semper
    • - sense
    • - Scythe - now it's a scythe
    • sense (ety)
    • seriatim (ref)
    • shake a leg (owa)
    • shirker (owa)
    • - simmer
    • Slang of the Fifties Guide (fiftiesweb)
    • Slang dictionary (probertencyclopaedia)
    • - Game
    • Game - wordplay
    • game (ety)
    • Game (nex)
    • Games (f-r)
    • stasis (ref)
    • - stepped
    • Sunder (you)
    • - synergy
    • synergism (ety)
    • - synergy
    • synergy (ety)
    • synergy (tak)
    • Teenlingo Dictionary (thesource4ym)
    • TIFF
    • tik - * tik
    • transparent
    • turpitude (ref)
    • - impatience
    • - Classes
    • Lessons (f-r)
    • - quaint
    • vacation
    • Vacation (f-r)
    • Vacation (w-a)
    • Vacation (wis)
    • Valetudinarian (you)
    • promise
    • - maybe
    • of
    • von (D), van (NL) - in names
    • - downer
    • WWW and human language (economist)
    • toe
    • character
    • demonstrate

    Word stories

    (E1) (L1) http://www.etymologie.info/
    Today's starting point for the word stories is electronic security. Reports about "phishing" and for a few days about "bloover" have been in the press for a few weeks now. In my opinion, both terms are suitable starting points for word stories. You can get to know Phishers Freak, the vacuum-sucking king "blue tooth", the eponym "to hoover" and the English "tooth" is a starting point for a whole row of teeth.

    But read for yourself:

    Phish, Phisher, Phishing, Freak (W1)
    Phishers Freak phisht fresh Phishe
    freshe Phishe phisht Phishers Freak

    (E?) (L?) Http://www.antiphishing.org/


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.bsi-fuer-buerger.de/abzocker/05_08.htm


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.cio.de/index.cfm?PageID=258&cat=det&maid=6278


    (E?) (L?) Http: //computerbetrug.de/phishing/index.php? P = 0 | 55 |


    (E?) (L?) Https://www.waywordradio.org/phish/


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,4149,1399670,00.asp


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.heute.t-online.de/ZDFheute/artikel/18/0,1367,COMP-0-2125330,00.html


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.pcworld.com/news/article/0,aid,113431,00.asp


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/scams/phishing/phishing.asp


    (E6) (L?) Http://www.sophos.com/spaminfo/explained/spamglossary.html#phishing


    (E3) (L1) https://www.webopedia.com/TERM/p/phishing.html


    (E1) (L?) Http://www.wordspy.com/words/phishing.asp


    (E1) (L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/turnsofphrase/tp-phi1.htm
    Phishing

    (E1) (L1) https://www.yourdictionary.com/wotd/wotd.pl?date=2004-06-21


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.sit.fraunhofer.de/german/hps1/phishing.pdf
    At the BSI it means:
    There has recently been another plague: "phishing". That sounds like going fishing - and that's exactly how it is. The word is made up of "password" and "fishing", in English "fishing for passwords".

    Fraudsters request in e-mails to follow a link and to update or provide personal data, passwords or PIN codes there. With the help of this data, the fraudsters can then freely plunder accounts.
    "Phisher" = "Password Fisherman".

    In "yourdictionary" one finds the statement that it is made up of "phreaking" and "fishing", whereby "phreaking" seems to have arisen as a contraction of "phone-freaking".
    ... "-freak" was a slang combining form indicating any kind of obsessive person, such as a "health-freak" or "control-freak." In the context of "phone-freaking", there may also have been a punning reference to the sound "frequencies" being generated by the phreak's mysterious "blue box."

    In this way you learn by the way that a "freak" was a "frequency generator". And to make it clear that it was a TelePHon pirate who spied on the free dialing frequencies with his "blue box", he was called "Phreak" = "Phone freak". And this "Ph" should also be in "Phishing". After all, "password fishing" is still mostly over the old telephone line.

    Phishing scams are when you get e-mails from alleged legitimate institutions (banks, eBay, whatever) saying that your account has been compromised or you've been charged a zillion dollars or whatever. You then visit the site, which is actually fake, fill out your personal information, and you're outta luck.

    Phishing e-mails are spreading rapidly: while the IT security company MessageLabs registered only 279 such e-mails in September 2003, in March 2004 there were already 215,643. So far, the English-speaking area has been particularly affected, the USA, Great Britain and Australia. But in the opinion of experts, it can only be a matter of time before the method is also popular in Germany.

    The Anti-Phishing Working Group (APWG) provides news about and current examples of e-mail fraud and scams (archived back to September 2003 with commentaries and summaries of known details). Also includes a list of Web resources providing trend reports, help for those who have been scammed, and the origin of the term "phishing." The APWG is "focused on eliminating the identity theft and fraud that result from the growing problem of phishing and email spoofing."
    Also a database of phishing examples is available.

    Created: 2005-01

    Bloover - The Viking with the Vacuum Cleaner (W1)

    (E?) (L?) Http://www.golem.de/0412/35398.html


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.google.de/search?q=bloover
    At the end of 2004 a new security hole opened up, which was also shamelessly exploited. With the large number of electronic dangers, one is almost speechless. But whenever words are missing, a new term appears. In this case it is "Bloover".

    It is a cell phone software that enables the cell phone to collect data using Bluetooth technology. The term "bloover" is made up of "bluetooth" and "hoover".

    Both of these terms have a little history for their part (see also the list of keywords). "Bluetooth" was the name of an ancient Viking who united Denmark and Norway. Accordingly, the so-called technology combines two electronic data processing devices. And "hoover" goes back to the company name "Hoover". This became known for its vacuum cleaners, and soon people spoke only of the "Hoover" instead of the "vacuum cleaner".

    And since the mobile phone software transforms the mobile phone into a data suction device based on Bluetooth, it is called "Bluetooth-Hoover", or "Bloover" for short.

    Created: 2005-01

    Hoover
    Vacuum cleaner
    William Henry Hoover (1849-1932) (W3)

    (E?) (L?) Http://www.ermel.org/usenet/desd/marken.txt


    (E1) (L1) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?l=h&p=11


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.hoover.de/geschichte.html


    (E?) (L?) Http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/eponyms.htm
    This shows once again how brand names influence our lives.
    The term "to hoover" (instead of "vacuuming") became an eponym and of course comes from the vacuum cleaner brand "Hoover", which is far better known in the UK than we are.
    And the company name goes back to "William Henry Hoover" an American industrialist (1849-1932).

    Created: 2005-01

    tooth, Zahn, dent, dental, dentist, indent, dandelion, * dant, * dent-, * ed-, eat, corner, edge, tusk, indentured, indentured servant, indentures, dent de lion, pissenlit, Bettsaecher, Dens leonis , Leontodon, Swines's Snout, Priest's Crown, Dandelion Beer, Dandelion Wine, Dandelion Coffee, trident, Tridentine Creed, Tridentine, Trento, Trient, Tridentum, tenacious, tang, tough, tongs (W1)

    (E?) (L?) Http://www.cai.cam.ac.uk/college/archive/exhib/anni/indenture.php


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/d/dandel08.html


    (E1) (L1) http://www.heinrich-tischner.de/anlag/verz/22spra.htm


    (E1) (L1) http://www.heinrich-tischner.de/22-sp/1sprach/kelt/akelt/d.htm

    * dant-tooth tooth


    (E1) (L1) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?l=t&p=14


    (E1) (L1) http://www.takeourword.com/TOW167/page1.html


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.teletour.de/italien/trentin/trient/
    In the Engl. "Tooth" can really be bitten. On the page of "Take our Word" you will find a whole set of teeth full of tooth words. "Zahn", French "dent" and Engl. In terms of literal history, "tooth" are still very close relatives and they all go for one idea. "* dant" or "* dent-" and then back to "* ed-" = "bite", which is what you get in English. "eat" can still be recognized almost unchanged.
    Also the German "corner" and the English. "edge" = "corner", "zigzag", "edge" should go back to it.

    The ancient Teutons had already made a "* tanthuz" out of it. The Anglo-Saxons threw away the "n" and shortened it to "toth", from where it was only a small step to "tooth". Another Germanic tribe made it "* tunth-sk", which then became "tusk" = "fang", "(elephant) tusk", "(wild boar) tusk".

    The relationship between the "dentist" and the "dental" can be seen immediately. But also the engl. "indent" = "indent", "interlock" and "dandelion" = "dandelion" are part of it. The prongs of the weed - which can be served as a salad - reminded many of the teeth of a lion, including the French, who called him "dent de lion", which then became English. "dandelion" was corrupted.

    • Because of its diuretic effect, the dandelion is also often called in French "pissenlit", which the Saarlanders Germanized as "Bettsäächer".
      In the Duden dictionary of synonyms one can find further terms:
      "Pusteblume" (which delights the children and makes the lawn keeper desperate), cow flower, chain flower, marigold, dog flower, egg puff, bed pisser, bed pisser, bed shit (the Saarland “bed sack” is not listed (!)), Milk bush, yolk bush, saublume , Flower of light.
      All of these terms allude to a certain property.

      The 10-page, very interesting article "Dandelion" in "Modern Herbal" on "www.botanical.com" contains further (English) names for the dandelion. His name is Latin "Dens leonis" and Linnaeus - who structures botany - gave it the Greek name "Leontodon". And many terms in other European languages ​​also refer to the "lion's tooth". In England you can still find the "pig's snout", "Swines's Snout", which the closed flower supposedly reminds of. Then there is the "Priest's Crown": After all threads of the "Dandelion" have failed, its platform is said to have been reminiscent of the shaved head of priests in the Middle Ages.
      And then there are some drinks in which "Löwenzahn" is involved or which are made from dandelion, "Dandelion Beer", "Dandelion Wine" and "Dandelion Coffee". But that distracts too much from the topic now. Although I really like to bite the "dandelion" dressed with bacon, I actually wanted to bite my own "teeth".
    After this little "Indent" so now to the English. "indent" = "indent" has a very figurative equivalent in the translation "interlock".

    I find "indenture" = "contract", "certificate" particularly interesting. This goes back to a medieval practice in which the parchments on which a treaty text was written (in duplicate) were divided; each contracting party received part of the document. In the event of a dispute, the two halves of the document could be placed next to each other. If they matched, were they properly "interlocked", at least the contractual basis was clear. (Which, of course, did not necessarily lead to a peaceful settlement.)

    And so the "contract worker", "contract worker" became the English. "indentured servant" (not because he was bitten all the time).

    Next we have the "trident". "trident", whose "teeth" are obvious.

    And now comes another interesting relative: the "Tridentine Creed".
    This Catholic creed had to be made by all clergymen until 1967 when they received their subdiaconate ordination or when they assumed higher ecclesiastical offices.
    This confession was established during the "Tridentine Council", the "Council of Trento" ("Concilio di Trento"). In 1564 it was established by Pope Pius IV. declared binding. The Italian "Trento" was still called Latin "Tridentum" by the ancient Romans. As a result, the names "Tridentine Creed" and "Tridentine Mass", engl. "Tridentine mass" explains.
    And the city of "Trient" was called "Dreizahn" because there were three characteristic mountain peaks in the immediate vicinity.

    On the page of "Take our Word" is then still in English. "tenacious" = German "sticky", "stubbornly holding" and in English. "tang" = German "handle pin", "(sea) tang" and thus also in English. "tough" = German "hard", "tough" and "tongs" = German "pliers" - which closes the circle to the dentist.

    But this brings you into the domain of "* ten" = German "hold", the relationship of which I have already presented in detail elsewhere. However, one can definitely imagine a connection between ide. "* dent-" = German "bite" and ide. Introduce "* ten" = German "hold".

    Created: 2005-01

    Book tip

    The book recommendation for today is:

    Gutknecht, Christoph
    I'll do it Mexican for you - Erotic word stories

    (E?) (L?) Http://rsw.beck.de/rsw/shop/default.asp?docid=118282


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.wams.de/data/2004/08/15/319225.html


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.zeit.de/2004/53/Fracht_im_Stehen_53
    I'll do it Mexican for you - Lots of erotic word stories
    Release date: September 22, 2004
    2004. About 256 pages. Paperback.
    approx EUR 9.90
    ISBN 3-406-51099-X
    Beck's series

    Professor Christoph Gutknecht, who also provides the "Word of the Month" for the etymology portal, has dedicated his new book to a "delicate" topic in the truest sense of the word ("delicate" = "fine", "delicate" goes back to Latin "delicere" = "attract", "delight").

    Although one of the most beautiful main things in the world, words are often lacking. Although the available vocabulary is quite extensive. Mr. Gutknecht illuminates the topic from the following pages:
    • Coito, ergo sum: reach into the full love life!
      Chapter 1 introduces some general words from the erotic environment.
    • In the case of a phallus - does Goethe really say everything?
      Chapter 2 turns to the names of certain parts of the body.
    • Libido, ergo bums: words of pleasure
      Chapter 3 examines the job titles. (Note: Is there an adequate word for the French "faire l'amour" in German?)
    • Variatio delectat: The so-called perversions
      Chapter 4 contains "abnormal" terms.
    • Beyond good and bad: Kebsen, call girls and brothels
      Chapter 5 examines the "commercial" names.
    • Man does not live from sex alone: ​​hearty and parodistic - anti-quotations and anti-speech types - the landlady and her verses - sublime poetry?
      And Chapter 6 tries to give humor its linguistic right.
    • And what, in my opinion, is also worth mentioning: the 20-page bibliography, in which you can find many works of verbal history.
    "Erotically speaking" you could say "There is nothing beautiful - unless you do it". But linguistically, you can also say "There is nothing good - unless you read it".

    If you have not just taken a vow of chastity, you will be happy to take this book to hand and discover with surprise how large our vocabulary is also (or perhaps especially) in the area of ​​interpersonal communication.

    Further information can be found at Amazon, at Beck-Verlag and in "Welt am Sonntag" and in "Zeit".

    Created: 2005-01

    • The origin of the word "adobe" from the Arabic language area is certainly correct, but, as I read once, not quite sufficient. For their part, the Arabs are said to have adopted the term from the Sumerians, the Assyrians or other inhabitants of Mesopotamia.This means that the term is at least 2000 years older than one is prepared to assume from the designation of origin "Arabic".
      M. Schumacher
    • Where does the word whimsy come from? In the Pschyrembel it says only: nun = top.
      V. Bonica
    • Since when has the word and the thing "confectionery" existed?
      R. Geuljans


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    • On 2005-02-12 I received the following information from Hern R. Geuljans:

      Please take a look at my article: "Acantonar", v.tr. "se tapir", "se blottir dans un coin". Dérivé du latin "canthus" = "bande de fer qui entoure la roue".

      Pour la petite histoire, on peut ajouter que le mot fr. "canton" avec le sens "ensemble de sections de route" et "cantonnier" ont été empruntés au languedocien ou formés sur "cantou" = "partie d'un pays", au 18e siècle. Il semble que c'est le marquis Henri de Carrion Nisas (1660-1754) de Pézenas (actuellement château Ormesson) qui a organisé l'entretien des routes par "canton" dans le Languedoc et que le système avec le mot a été ensuite adopté dans la capitale et la langue française. Le seul doute qui subsiste c’est que les mots français n’apparaissent que bien plus tard dans les dictionnaires. Allemand "canton", néerlandais "canton" viennent de l'italien de Lombardie "cantone" à travers la Suisse.



    Search terms and new terms of the week
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    • Barnette, Martha - Dog Days and Dandelions
    • Barnette, Martha - From Spare Ribs to Humble Pie
    • Barnette, Martha - Guide to the Animal Meanings
    • Barnette, Martha - Ladyfingers & Nun's Tummies
    • - Bartel
    • - base
    • base (ety)
    • beddamer
    • bedlam (owa)
    • bedlam
    • bedlamer
    • bedlemer
    • worse
    • bellamer
    • bemonked
    • Berserk Rabbit runs amok
    • Berserk
    • - apply
    • - blazer
    • - blazer
    • blazer (ety)
    • Graubünden Romansch (wikipedia)
    • Bug
    • Bug (abc)
    • bug (ety)
    • Bug (wor)
    • - Bow, bow of the ship
    • canton
    • canton
    • cantonnier
    • celerity (ref)
    • chamorro
    • cruel
    • cruelty
    • - demissio
    • German
    • German
    • German (f-r)
    • German for elites - Kählbrandt, Roland
    • German for connoisseurs - Schneider, W.
    • German, Tudesque (lexilogos)
    • German language in Usenet (faql)
    • - service
    • diffident (ref)
    • Dog Days and Dandelions - Barnette, Martha
    • Dorabella cipher
    • - rotate
    • - drug
    • Drug
    • - drug
    • drug (ety)
    • - eclecticism
    • elbow-grease (owa)
    • English Place-Names (questia)
    • Enigma variations
    • 'etymology' (bbc)
    • 'etymology' (worldwideschool)
    • Etymology
    • fagot
    • - finished
    • - promote
    • From Spare Ribs to Humble Pie - Barnette, Martha
    • - Fallen
    • GNU - language of Papua New Guinea
    • Guide to the Animal Meanings - Barnette, Martha
    • House
    • House - excited
    • - hello
    • - Dog
    • Dog - get on the dog
    • Dog - come to the dog (wis)
    • Dog - get on the dog
    • Dog - that's where the dog is buried
    • Dog - the dog is buried there (nex)
    • Dog - the dog is buried there (wis)
    • Dog - that's where the dog is buried
    • Dog - the dog is going crazy in the pan (wis)
    • Dog - the dog goes crazy in the pan
    • Dog - that's a fat dog! (nex)
    • Dog
    • Dog (nex)
    • Dog (wis)
    • inamorata (ref)
    • Jack of Bedlam
    • slang
    • Canton
    • Canton
    • Cantonist
    • Kent place names
    • Kent
    • knight
    • - well behaved
    • Ladyfingers & Nun's Tummies - Barnette, Martha
    • - Legates
    • - Ladder
    • - ladder
    • Mad Tom
    • mail
    • mail (ety)
    • Mail (WWW)
    • matrocliny (wsm)
    • - Must
    • - must
    • most (ety)
    • Most Spoken Languages ​​in World (krysstal)
    • muliebrity (wsm)
    • Multi-Site Index (alt-usage-english)
    • mother
    • mother (ety)
    • Mother
    • mother machine (wsp)
    • all alone
    • Onomatology (ethz)
    • nefarious (ref)
    • - nuppe
    • Onomastics
    • Onomatology
    • Origin of Words (nausetnewcomers)
    • - variegate
    • Philosophy
    • Phonology
    • Place-Names, English (questia)
    • pumpernickel
    • - quality
    • Quality (abc)
    • quality (ety)
    • - Smoke
    • - sardonic
    • Bushel - put his light under the bushel
    • Switzerland
    • - blessed
    • slang
    • - spa
    • spa (ety)
    • spa (wsm)
    • Speech Accent Archive (gmu)
    • - toi
    • TOI Toi Toi
    • toi-toi-toi (blu)
    • Tom Foolery
    • Tom of Bedlam
    • insecure cantonist
    • US Food - Books
    • US fun books
    • US animals - books
    • - seduce
    • was dialing
    • war-driving
    • war-walking
    • Word List (alt-usage-english)

    • ... The word "delivery room" comes from the old German word "kreißen". It is the outdated word for "to be in labor pains" - Kind regards - R. Bernhardi
    • (E?) (L?) Http://www.forumromanum.de/
    • A new entry was posted in the forum forum from http://www.etymologie.info/.
      Subject: Facilities
      Content: Hello, does anyone know the origin of the word "facility" or "facilities"?
      Gundula
    • ... I'm searching the etymology of the word "coppa" (neapolitan dialect). In italian its equivalent word is "sopra" ("over" in english). I think it derives from German words "Kopf" or "Kuppe".
      I'm interested in italian dialects, you can find my dictionary of Pietraroia dialect (south Italy, Benevento) on web site http://www.ilc.it/. About 1,5% of Pietraroia dialect words derive from Gothic, Longobard, old high German.
      Napoli February 24 - Pierino Bello



    Search terms and new words of the week
    2005-02-20 - 2005-02-27


    • - Eve
    • evening (wsm)
    • - alas
    • Adam's apple
    • adder
    • - aper
    • job
    • Work
    • Work (nex)
    • - assassin
    • Assassin (abc)
    • Assassin (DE)
    • assassin (ety)
    • assassin (mww)>
    • Assassin (SA)
    • Assassin (UK)
    • Assassin (wde)
    • Assassin (you)
    • - breath
    • - wait a minute
    • Barbarian
    • beckon (owa)
    • authorized
    • - with special needs
    • blackguard (ref)
    • - bland
    • bland (ety)
    • bland (owa)
    • blooper (owa)
    • Cooper
    • - bolero
    • bolero (ety)
    • botticella
    • vat
    • - exercise art
    • - capon
    • cavalcade (ref)
    • choucroute
    • cob
    • cobweb
    • copulare
    • copuler
    • couple
    • cup
    • Cuppa
    • - lady
    • lady (ety)
    • Lady (pri)
    • - last
    • - discredit
    • Dizionario del dialetto di Pietraroia (ilc)
    • effeff, ff
    • Deposit facility
    • decide
    • decide
    • To decide
    • equus
    • - seize
    • eschew (ref)
    • Etymology of technology terms (sfgate)
    • - Protestant
    • excellent
    • Excellence
    • faciliter
    • facilitate
    • facility management
    • facility
    • Facility manager
    • faineant (ref)
    • Facility
    • February
    • February (pri)
    • February revolution
    • February (ety)
    • fiduciary (ref)
    • - fisole
    • forty winks (owa)
    • Justifiably so
    • Fug
    • g - * g
    • - gasteig
    • hot
    • hot
    • glib answer (owa)
    • - gonos
    • God
    • God (f-r)
    • God - help yourself, so God will help you (w-a)
    • God in France - Live like God in France
    • - terrific
    • grandiose (ety)
    • head
    • - Notebook
    • notebook (ety)
    • booklet (wsm)
    • - hope
    • Hope dies last, Die
    • Hope, hope (f-r)
    • hoosegow (wsm)
    • hoosgow (wsm)
    • - huth
    • - improvise
    • incommunicado (wsm)
    • Instituto Linguistico Campano (ilc)
    • chapel
    • cap
    • broken
    • keep
    • Keeper
    • - ker
    • ker (ety)
    • keu- - * keu-
    • - collocate
    • head
    • head
    • Paddock
    • couple
    • copulation
    • copulate
    • Delivery room
    • - cross
    • Cross (f-r)
    • Kriemhild
    • bucket
    • Cooper
    • Küffer
    • Küffner
    • Küfner
    • Skid
    • Kufner
    • Kulm
    • culminate
    • Kuppa
    • Knoll
    • dome
    • Coupler
    • Matchmaker
    • coupling
    • legerdemain (ref)
    • Lindworm
    • lint - * lint
    • mano a mano (wsm)
    • matriarch (wsm)
    • mellifluous (ref)
    • mirth (owa)
    • misandry (wsm)
    • - monitoring
    • nose
    • Nose - fooling around (nex)
    • Nose - fed up (nex)
    • Nose (nex)
    • Nerds And Words (sfgate)
    • - Oil
    • Oil (øl) (f-r)
    • - ears
    • Ears - have a fist behind your ears
    • Ears - wet behind the ears
    • Ears - write something behind your ears
    • oust (owa)
    • perforce (ref)
    • perspicacity (ref)
    • Pietraroia dialect Dictionary (ilc)
    • - dick
    • pistolero (wsm)
    • polymath (ref)
    • pot
    • Pot
    • prendre un pot
    • Prince role
    • - rollmops
    • beautiful
    • beautiful (f-r)
    • scandal
    • sororal (wsm)
    • Marginal lending facility
    • - Pen
    • - pen
    • Pen (f-r)
    • symbol
    • symbol
    • symbol (ety)
    • Symbol stories
    • Symbol histories (symbols)
    • Symbolic logic
    • Symbol lexicon (symbols)
    • Symbol lexicon (symbols)
    • temblor (wsm)
    • tentative (owa)
    • nonsense
    • couple
    • - wackerstein

    Bounty (W2)

    (E1) (L1) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=bounty&searchmode=none


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/gloss.html#b


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.thebounty.com/


    (E?) (L1) http://www.wasistwas.de/
    The Mutiny on the Bounty - Adventure and Reality
    (E?) (L?) Http://www.wispor.de/wpx-fahr.htm
    The Engl. "bounty" = "generosity" = "generosity", "premium", "reward" migrated in the 13th century. from old French "bonte" = "goodness" to England. It comes from the Latin "bonitatem" (nom. Bonitas) = ​​"goodness" from "bonus" = "good".

    "Bounty" was the name of the merchant ship (26m long, 7.5m wide, 220t) with which Captain Bligh sailed from England on November 28th, 1787 with the order to collect a shipload of plants from the breadfruit tree in Tahiti and to breed them Bring the West Indies.

    Created: 2005-02

    Pitcairn (W3)

    (E6) (L1) http://www.markuskappeler.ch/tex/fratex.html


    (E?) (L?) Http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_country_name_etymologies


    (E?) (L?) Http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pitcairn_Islands


    (E?) (L?) Http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crown_colony
    Pitcairn Islands (overseas territory of the United Kingdom): the remote islands were discovered by a member of the English Captain Philip Carteret's crew in his boat HMS Swallow in July 1767. The man who discovered it was "son to Major Pitcairn" of the marines , and the main island was called Pitcairn's Island in his honor.

    Created: 2005-02

    Pitcairnese, Pitkern, Pitcairnese Language - Norfolk English - Pitcairn English (W3)

    (E?) (L?) Http://www.ethnologue.org/show_language.asp?code=PIH


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.ethnologue.org/show_country.asp?name=Pitcairn


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.lareau.org/pitlang.html


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.ni.net.nf/users/nics/bounty/language.htm


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.pitcairners.org/language.html
    "Pitcairnese" is the name of the island dialect in Pitcairn.It originated from the English of the mutineers of the Bounty who settled here and the Tahitian of the women they brought with them from Tahiti.

    Norfolk Islanders and our Pitcairn ancestors, speak among themselves in their language, a beautiful patois, a made-up language. Put together from pieces of English and Tahitian and from natural responses to the natural surroundings where they live in.
    Here are some words and phrases: SINGLE WORDS - (CLICK ON THE NORFOLK WORD TO HEAR IT IN THE NORFOLK TONGUE)

    Norfolk Island (Australia) (Norfolk Island: The Website)

    Created: 2005-02

    University of Toronto
    Mots français d'origine non-latine
    gaulois, celtique, germanique, allemand, néerlandais, italy, espagnol, portugais ...

    (E1) (L1) http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/epc/langueXIX/dg/


    (E1) (L1) http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/epc/langueXIX/dg/08_t1-2.htm
    Traité de la formation de la langue
    par Adolphe Hatzfeld, Arsène Darmester, Antoine Thomas, Octave Gréard, Louis Baudrillart, Clément Marguerin, Frédéric Godefroy, Maurice Schöne, Alfred Delboulle, Pierre-Augustin Pelissier et Jules Bardoux
    contenant:
    • 1 ° La prononciation figurée des mots;
    • 2 ° Leur etymology; leurs transformations successives, avec renvoi aux chapitres du traité qui les expliquent, et l'exemple le plus ancien de leur emploi;
    • 3 ° Leur sens propre, leurs sens derivés et figurés, dans l’ordre à la fois historique et logique de leur développement;
    • 4 ° Des exemples tirés des meilleurs écrivains, avec indication de la source des passages cités
    Paris, Delagrave, 1890

    The second chapter of the "Dictionnaire général (1890-1900)" contains a 93-page list of non-Latin French foreign words.
    It lists terms that have entered the French language from other languages. Many of these terms have also been incorporated into German or English. (The spelling in the recipient languages ​​can vary.)
    I have assigned the corresponding sections and the associated comments in the appendix as "isms" to the respective countries / continents of origin.

    Gaulois | Celtique modern | Grec | Germanique (allemand ancien) | Allemand modern | Anglais | Norois | Néerlandais | Provençal | Italy | Espagnol | Portugais | Roumain | French patois | Patois de la Suisse romande (franco-provençal) | Creole | Basque | Slave. - Lithuania | Hébreu | Arabe | Langues ouralo-altaïques (finnois, hongrois, turc, etc.) | Persan | Langues de l'Inde | ptien et copte | Langues de l'extrême Orient | Malais et langues océaniennes | Langues africaines | Langues américaines | Argot | Onomatopée

    Created: 2005-02

    • On the subject of Saarland at:
      flemm = from the French (colloquial) of avoir la flemme = to have enough of something, to be too tired to carry on.
      Freck = Luxembourgish "vreck sin" = to be wrecked.
      AstroRudi
    • A new entry was posted in the forum forum from http://www.etymologie.info/.
      Subject: (List and) "Tücke" and "Leuk"
      Content: I found the following for the term "Tücke" in the etymolgic dictionary of German: "There are no safe Germanic or non-Germanic connection possibilities". In (ancient) Greek, however, there is the term "tyk (h) ä", which also means "cunning": could ancient Greek have directly influenced German? I'm also interested in the name "Leuk ..." (= "white"; -> "Leukocytes"), which is very common around here (border Lux / Saar / Lothringen / Rh-Pf.)?
      Greetings Rudi
    • A new entry was posted in the forum forum from http://www.etymologie.info/.
      Subject: RE: Rhine
      Content: Hello Edo, I think the "h" after the "r" is pretty clear, so yes to your question, it's that simple. see also: Dictionary of ancient philosophy (from Beck-Verlag under "panta rhei" and "rhoe" (from "rhein" = flow) with reference to "Th. Buchheim: Transient Becoming and Forming Form, in ABG (archive for Terminology) 41, (1999), 7-34, esp. 28 ff.) But I wonder how such Greek terms (despite the changed Latin form (Rhenus)) could be transferred into German in their original Greek form: see also my current one Contribution to the topic "Tricks" and "Leuk-".
      Greetings AstroRudi
    • A new entry was posted in the forum forum from http://www.etymologie.info/.
      Subject: Assassins are not Hashemites!
      Contents: under "http://www.etymologie.info/~e/d_/de-pflanz.html#Assassin" you can find information on the term "Assassinen" in German. And it is stated that these are the "Hashemites". That is simply wrong. The "Hashemites" are a sub-tribe of the Quraish. The Prophet Muhammad is descended from the Hashemite family. Today a king of the Hashemite tribe rules Jordan. ... What was meant, however, are the "Haschaschiyun", the "Hashish eaters". During the Crossing Period there was a man named Hasan-i Sabah who ruled on Mount Alamut in northern Iran. He and his disciples were all originally Ismailis (seven Shiites). this extreme group used to kill all kinds of Christian and Muslim masters. But one never assaulted poor people. To that extent it was terror against the mighty. ...
      Mulan2
    • About the etimology of German word "Kopf" I want to observe that its parent latin word "cuppa" (Serenus Sammonicus, III century B.C.), derived from the classical "cupa", means "barrel", "cask". In metaphoric meaning the German "Kopf" = "head" would be the the "holder", "container" of the brain. Also the German "Kuppe" = "top" will derive from "Kopf" because the head is situated at the top of the human body.
      I think this would be the correct etymology of the German word "Kopf" and the dialectal south-italian word "coppa" = "over" or italian "sopra".
      (E?) (L?) Http://www.ilc.it/
      The web site "http://www.ilc.it/" (linguistic institute of Campania / Italy), directed by prof. Amedeo Messina, promotes the preservation of culture, traditions and dialects of the Campania, italian district (lander), where lies Pietraroia, little samnite municipality of my origin in the Appennines mountains. I have written the "Pietraroia dialect Dictionary" kindly published on the prof. Messina web site.
      The survey "parole 'e Napule" on the above site treats the origin of some words and sentences of neapolitan dialect.
      (A: Pierino Bello, Napoli)
    • can you clarify the origin of the word "bread"?
      I learned in Classical Greek that the word "bread" comes from the strong aorist of the verb "Edomai" ("I eat"). - "Edomai" - "Ebrotän" - "Brotesomai" - "Brotos-Broteos".



    • - 252
    • abacus
    • - from to
    • cunning
    • - abis
    • Abortion
    • dull
    • - resigns
    • as
    • - age
    • - amplitude
    • amplitude (ety)
    • Assassin
    • - ast
    • on
    • out
    • author
    • authority
    • bibacious (wsm)
    • billet (ref)
    • loaf
    • cook the books (owa)
    • cut the mustard (owa)
    • - fat dog
    • Diesel minute minute
    • dunce (owa)
    • earwig
    • earworm
    • ebrious (wsm)
    • - eleven
    • eleven (ety)
    • Elf (f-r)
    • sound out
    • discuss
    • eager - to be eager for something
    • 'Etymology' (University of Erfurt)
    • - excellence
    • fiat (ref)
    • - figura
    • Flemm
    • - research
    • Research
    • Freck
    • - Salary
    • Salary
    • gelid (ref)
    • heresy
    • head
    • Main (f-r)
    • - hero
    • - dedication
    • incongruous (ref)
    • - Italy
    • - cal factor
    • - surrender
    • - cat table
    • - clip
    • Knout - to stand under someone's knout
    • - coincidence
    • - kornelia
    • - koschel
    • Knoll
    • Whim
    • Mood (pri)
    • Mood (w-a)
    • - wages
    • Wages
    • - lyric
    • - man
    • Man
    • man (ety)
    • man breasts (wsp)
    • man cave (wsp)
    • man friday (wsm)
    • Man in red, The
    • man in the middle attack (wsp)
    • man words (tak)
    • Mass
    • mass (ety)
    • Mass beer
    • mass customization (wsp)
    • - Mephistopheles
    • Mephistopheles (ety)
    • Monday
    • Monday (pri)
    • - whimpering
    • mulct (ref)
    • Catchy tune
    • OK
    • place
    • locate
    • Toponymy (heveller)
    • out
    • paean (ref)
    • - par
    • par (ety)
    • Par (you)
    • Par ordre de Mufti (blu)
    • be unlucky
    • perce-oreille
    • - poehlen
    • polyphagia (wsm)
    • - French fries
    • French fries
    • postprandial (wsm)
    • Return on internet
    • RoI
    • salubrious (ref)
    • describe
    • Shame
    • languish
    • slender
    • revile
    • narrow
    • sand
    • smile
    • dirty laugh
    • - Shield
    • - difficult
    • small
    • - smart
    • smart (ety)
    • smart (tak)
    • Smart Alec (wor)
    • smart drug (wsp)
    • smart dust (wsp)
    • Smart gun (WWW)
    • - speak
    • to speak (f-r)
    • Stump
    • Stump
    • dull
    • blunt
    • - subduction
    • surreptitious (owa)
    • woman
    • Woman (he) (f-r)
    • widget (owa)

    • ... I am currently trying to work out a theory on the basis of existing and newly formed words. A kind of newspeak and new thinking, but in a good sense.
      For this I need the concept of mapping structure in the sense of regression, but not with the aim of re-formation, i.e. formation, but in the sense and with the aim of degenerating structure.
      The regression has already been documented for me and can at most be replaced by the term training, but the training does not reflect the also-state of having to regress in order to re-form.
      Something different from the illustration, in the sense of the decrease in the formed structure, but without re-formation.
      The word is already occupied in the sense of the projection of something in a pictorial form and under no circumstances did I want to allow ambiguities to flow in.
      Greetings, Carsten
    • something else about your category Saarland: "awei", ... etc
      I spent my youth in Swabia ...: There was a fool's battle cry "Narri, narro" to which one had to answer: "Allweil no". The "translation": "Still" does not reflect the meaning correctly; What was meant and is (as an answer to a provocative question) rather: "of course I can" or "I can still do that" or "always (and especially now) ready (for all outrages)". I leave it to your imagination to decide what you were ready for right now and immediately?
      Greetings (Astro) Rudi
    • A new entry was posted in the forum forum from http://www.etymologie.info/.
      Subject: Biafra; literal meaning ?!
      Hello, what is the literal meaning of the word "Biafra"? What language does the word "Baifra" come from? Who was the first to use "Biafra"? Is "Biafra" an authentic African word or does it come from the Europeans? "Biafara" is written on old maps from the 16th to 18th centuries - is this something different from "Biafra"?
      Steve


  • -3-
  • Month-3-

    Search terms and new words of the week
    2005-03-06 - 2005-03-13


    • Coin abbreviations (genealogy)
    • Adjectives graduated and not (linguist)
    • - adlatus
    • - allergic
    • always
    • all the time
    • old job titles (genealogy)
    • old disease names (genealogy)
    • ambuscade (ref)
    • Archaisms
    • - archaism
    • - atopy
    • awei
    • - excavator
    • Terms and idioms (to know)
    • Job titles, old (genealogy)
    • Job titles, Greek (genealogy)
    • Job titles, Latin (genealogy)
    • Biafra
    • - flower
    • Flower - say something through the flower
    • broke (ety)
    • - leave lying idle
    • - bronze
    • bronze (ety)
    • Bronze broiler
    • Bronze age
    • Brooklynisms (lampos)
    • - union
    • Buergschaft (f-r)
    • coquette (ref)
    • - There
    • - who consumes the best peat for the master
    • German
    • German
    • German (f-r)
    • German for elites - Kählbrandt, Roland
    • German for connoisseurs - Schneider, W.
    • German, Tudesque (lexilogos)
    • Dialect Topography (University of Toronto)
    • - dream
    • dream - I have a dream
    • Dream (abc)
    • dream (ety)
    • dream (mww)>
    • dream (tak)
    • dream or mirth (tak)
    • - you
    • Durand Line
    • - honor
    • - HONOR
    • Honor (nex)
    • English Varieties (linguist)
    • - event
    • Event
    • event (ety)
    • event horizon (wsp)
    • Family history Vogtland (University of Heidelberg)
    • Family names (genealogy)
    • Family names (radioeins)
    • Law of the thumb
    • fey (ref)
    • fifth column (owa)
    • Finlandization (wsm)
    • Company name (wikipedia)
    • first water (owa)
    • Field names in Westphalia (linguist)
    • fourth estate (owa)
    • Frankfurt Romans
    • - fut
    • gamboge (wsm)
    • - justice
    • Justice (noun)
    • History of the German language (linguist)
    • - gillenau
    • gourmand (ref)
    • Greek job titles (genealogy)
    • hackney (wsm)
    • hotel
    • hotel (ety)
    • hotel (tak)
    • whore
    • - integration
    • - Yes
    • Yes (f-r)
    • cash register
    • - kettcar
    • - Child
    • child (ety)
    • child (ety)
    • Child (f-r)
    • Child (mww)
    • kind words (tak)
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    Search terms and new terms of the week
    2005-03-13 - 2005-03-20


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    • ... I work for a mobile care service. We have to wrap a patient's legs every day with compression wraps and these wraps are fixed with so-called "mothers-in-law" after the swaddling activity is completed.
      Now my question: Is there an etymological background for these "mothers-in-law" or is it just the "vernacular" active here in terms of linguistic history?
      ... Horst Kiefer
    • The saludo desde la ciudad de México: busco la etimología del apellido MACOUZET
      Muchas gracias Dr. Manuel Macouzet



    Search terms and new words of the week
    2005-03-20 - 2005-03-27


    • Abbasids
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    Word stories

    (E1) (L1) http://www.etymologie.info/
    If you are keen on today's word stories but then find that you already know how to discuss them, then you are out of luck.

    eager - to be eager for something, have bad luck (W3)

    In earlier times birds were caught with "pitch rods" = "sticks that were coated with pitch". The birds, which had the "bad luck" to sit on it, were so "keen" on this device that they could no longer detach themselves.
    Since the 16th century the term was also used in a figurative sense.
    Pitch was also used to seal boats. (If you weren't unlucky, you were really unlucky.)

    Created: 2005-03

    Place, locate, discuss (W1)

    (E3) (L1) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ort


    (E3) (L1) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ortsname
    The "place" has a similar fate as the point. From a mathematical point of view, the point is nothing, although it is one of the essential concepts in mathematics. And so the "place" is actually nothing. It originally meant the "point" (in particular it is said to have referred to the "point" of a (stab) weapon. (And which part really still belongs to the point? virtual point disappears.)
    The old Gl. In any case, "ord" referred to a "spear" (also "tip"). In the language of the miners, the "place" is still the end of a mining line.
    It becomes very interesting in the term "discuss" = "discuss in detail". It was formed in the 16th century. as a loan transfer of the Latin "determinare" = "delimit", "fix". When looking for a German equivalent, one certainly had the idea that the discussion of a situation should serve to bring a matter to the point, or "to go to the end".
    Today a place is usually something bigger. Whole villages fit on the old "tip".
    Only in certain situations do you try to choose the place as small as possible - then when you urgently need to go to the quiet "Oertchen".

    Created: 2005-03

    Uni Erfurt - 'Etymology'

    (E?) (L?) Http://www.christianlehmann.eu/ling/wandel/Ursprache.html

    ...
    Etymology enjoys an ambivalent status in the educated world outside and even within linguistics. On the one hand, it is perceived as entertaining and aha-adventurous. On the other hand, it does not play a prominent role in today's (historical linguistic) science, and many educated people (whether linguists or not) consider it to be not entirely serious.
    ...


    The 3-page article on etymology still has space for some interesting word examples.

    Created: 2005-03

    Book tip

    The book recommendation for today is:

    Duden - Volume 05 - Duden Foreign Dictionary

    (E?) (L?) Http://www.duden.de/fremdwoerterduden/


    (E?) (L?) Http://www.presseportal.de/story.htx?nr=651782