Is Imperial College London good for CS

Imperial College, ETH, Cambridge or TUM?

new clueless  📅 26.12.2017 00:50:49
Imperial College, ETH, Cambridge or TUM?
Hello,
I'm about to finish my chemistry bachelor's degree at the Technical University of Munich and have applied for various master's programs.

Imperial College London - Master of Research, 1 year, 60% research, 40% teaching
Cambridge - Master of Philosophy, 1 year, 100% research
ETH - Master of Science, 2 years (if everything from the Bachelor is recognized), mainly teaching

It should also be noted that there are additional tuition fees of around € 11,000 for the Master's year in Cambridge and at the IC. However, you save a year of total study time.
I would like to specialize in catalysis / electrochemistry (Reisner in Cambridge, Schmidt ETH, Britovsek IC - only if someone should know).
I have already been accepted for Imperial College, I still have Skype interviews ahead of me for Cambridge and I only recently gave up my application for ETH.
I am definitely planning to do a PhD, although (as things stand at the moment) I want to switch to business. In terms of my job, I am completely free. I also toyed with the idea of ​​switching to management consulting.

Where do I get the best chances of getting a PhD position at one of the universities? For the PhD, I would definitely need a scholarship at IC and Cambridge. How likely are the odds? What about universities in America? I have read that you apply there with a bachelor's degree. Does this mean that a Master of Research no longer makes sense or am I sorry if I do not do a Master of Science? Is my future employer even interested in where you studied / researched?
Or should I rather - the comparatively - cheap route and do my Masters in Munich?

If someone has experience or answers to the many questions, I would be very happy to hear from you.

Merry Christmas and best regards!
Re: Imperial College, ETH, Cambridge or TUM?
From new clueless Hello,
I am about to finish my chemistry bachelor's degree at the Technical University of Munich and have applied for various master’s programs.

Imperial College London - Master of Research, 1 year, 60% research, 40% teaching
Cambridge - Master of Philosophy, 1 year, 100% research
ETH - Master of Science, 2 years (if everything from the Bachelor is recognized), mainly teaching

It should also be noted that there are additional tuition fees of around € 11,000 for the Master's year in Cambridge and at the IC. However, you save a year of total study time.
I would like to specialize in catalysis / electrochemistry (Reisner in Cambridge, Schmidt ETH, Britovsek IC - only if someone should know).
I have already been accepted for Imperial College, I still have Skype interviews ahead of me for Cambridge and I only recently gave up my application for ETH.
I am definitely planning to do a PhD, although (as things stand at the moment) I want to switch to business. Regarding the job, I am completely free. I also toyed with the idea of ​​switching to management consulting.

Where do I get the best chances of getting a PhD position at one of the universities? For the PhD, I would definitely need a scholarship at IC and Cambridge. How likely are the odds? What about universities in America? I have read that you apply there with a bachelor's degree. Does this mean that a Master of Research no longer makes sense or am I sorry if I do not do a Master of Science? Is my future employer even interested in where you studied / researched?
Or should I prefer to take the comparatively cheap route and do my Masters in Munich?

If someone has experience or answers to the many questions, I would be very happy to receive an answer.

Merry Christmas and best regards!
Hello,

everything seems well thought out to me.

Would be comments on my part. The PhD takes place in (English-speaking) abroad
often directly after the bachelor's degree and accordingly takes 5
Years. Through the path Bachelor (3Y) -> Master (1-2Y) -> PhD (5Y)
you are losing valuable time.
If you want to go to the UB, then it will definitely "only" work with my master's degree - especially from
well-known institutions such as Cambridge, ETH or IC. A few words
About the UB: For many, the UB is just a phase of life - nothing
you want to (can) do it in the long term, as the working hours there are very draining
are. After a few years, however, you have many doors to others
Company / activities open.

The place of study is definitely relevant. Experience abroad in particular is very welcome!
Unfortunately, the German universities are all equally mediocre, so you can't lure anyone out from behind the stove.
I don't know whether it is worth paying money for a PhD in the USA. If that's not MIT or Caltech etc. I doubt that you will "get the money out".
Especially since the job market for chemists in the USA is relatively poor:
https://www.chemistryworld.com/news/job-worries-investigated-by-american-chemical-society-/9565.article

For the PhD, I would personally prefer the ETH - also one of the top addresses worldwide.
If you can afford it, I would do a master’s degree at IC / Cambridge - this will set you apart from 98% of your competitors from Germany. Then either work directly (UB or similar) or for the PhD at ETH Zurich. Hard way - but should pay off

Merry Christmas and best regards
aldante  📅 26.12.2017 15:02:35
Re: Imperial College, ETH, Cambridge or TUM?
In the USA, you apply directly for the PhD in the last year of your bachelor's degree, as mentioned by Chemiker42. If you want to do a PhD in the US, a Masters, no matter where, is a waste of time - do the GRE and apply for a PhD program.

In the USA it is also common practice at most good universities to get guaranteed automatic full funding (for tuition fees and living expenses) for the PhD (partly through scholarships, partly through RA / TA positions), i.e. money is not a problem. Details can be found on the page of each PhD program. See, for example, http://chemistry.mit.edu/graduate-admissions/faq Contrary to all prejudices, a US PhD is in truth usually the cheapest option financially, as it saves the Master’s tuition fees and allows you to fully rely on it PhD can focus.

In the UK, the PhD is traditionally a separate 3-year course, which means that you traditionally apply for the PhD in the last year of your Masters - but that has changed a lot in the last ten years and there are more and more UK universities that admit you to a combined Master's / PhD program, whereby admission to the PhD part is conditional on good Master's grades. (But ultimately you have the same phenomenon in the USA, because you get kicked out of your PhD if you fail the comps.)

There are also many scholarships in Great Britain, but most of them only cover the tuition fees for EU citizens without a UK residence - details can be found on every university or department page. In business-related or industry-related subjects, however, there are often grants that also cover the cost of living for EU citizens without a UK residence - you always have to read the details carefully.
new clueless  📅 27.12.2017 13:02:11
Re: Imperial College, ETH, Cambridge or TUM?
By Chemiker42If you can afford it, I would do a master’s degree at IC / Cambridge - this will set you apart from 98% of your competitors from Germany. Then either work directly (UB or similar) or for the PhD at ETH Zurich. Hard way - but should pay off

Merry Christmas and best regards
Thanks for the detailed answer. I tend to do it that way.

I don't think doing a master's is a waste of time. Since the undergrade program in the states consists of four years, with a large (one-year) research project at the end, the German Bachelor's degree cannot be equated with it. I think without any research experience, the chances of being accepted are not very good.

I found very few for a master’s program ...
Nick_  📅 27.12.2017 13:48:51
Re: Imperial College, ETH, Cambridge or TUM?
QuoteIs my future employer even interested in where you studied / researched?

There is no general answer to that; some employers care, others don't. The decisive criterion for your future employer will be your professional qualifications.

In principle, nothing speaks against changing the university more often, only it should be less about collecting "trophies" (Cambridge, ETH) than about advancing you professionally. The human factor also plays an important role in this. Ideally, you can use the existing network of a professor, make yourself your own and thus achieve a professional depth that is not possible through "haphazard" changes.
aldante  📅 27.12.2017 13:49:52
Re: Imperial College, ETH, Cambridge or TUM?
@new clueless:

You are wrong. I know countless (!) German Bachelor graduates who were accepted directly into a PhD program in the USA. About 1.5 of the 4 years of a US bachelor's degree are general education, so you only have 2.5 years of chemistry in the bachelor's degree. And the "one year" that you need for the bachelor thesis is of course not a full-time year, but a year during which you also take countless modules. The actual time that you put into a US bachelor thesis is therefore comparable to that in Germany.

As I said: If you want to do a PhD in the USA, a master’s degree is a complete waste of time and money. It is even possible that this will reduce your chances of getting a PhD in the United Statesdecrease, since a master’s degree in the USA quickly sends the signal "did not manage to be accepted into a good PhD program straight away". You also have a US PhD two Years of coursework (since the master’s degree is integrated, so to speak) and thus you learn more than a UK Masters plus PhD (where you only have one year of coursework).

After you misquoted I don't know What you have not found for the master. I accept scholarships? Just There are of course no scholarships for the Master’s (logical - the Master’s is the cash cow of British universities), but there are always scholarships in Great Britain that also cover the Master’s part if you apply for the PhD directly after the Bachelor’s degree. (The reason why it has developed this way is of course that the British universities were afraid that otherwise all good Bachelor graduates would go straight to the USA.) An example: http://www.sanger.ac.uk/ about / study / phd-programs / 4-year-phd-programs There it is also explicitly stated that these scholarships are aimed at Bachelor students. You have to do research at every university in question and at every relevant research council - it's a lot of work, but you won't get around it.

I have scientific experience in both countries (not chemistry, but that doesn't matter) - if you want to hear my opinion, go to the USA. The scientific world is much more developed there than in Great Britain. In the UK, PhD funding is much more arduous (see above), lecturer salaries are lower in the UK, the standard of living is lower in the UK, etc. There are tons of overseas PhD students and faculty in the UK who much prefer to stay in the US would be. Conversely, this phenomenon rarely occurs. Unfortunately for many, Great Britain is only the second choice. Yes, there are some really excellent universities in the UK, but the overall research environment and the training of young scientists is still not comparable to the US.

If you still want to do your PhD in the UK, I don't think it doesn't matter where you do your Master's. Getting accepted into a good PhD program in the UK as a good Masters graduate is not particularly difficult. (Just like being a good undergraduate graduate, getting accepted into a good PhD program in the United States isn't particularly difficult.)