What is it like to be a doctor

Concerns being a doctor

Nemo-.  📅 05.01.2018 19:45:18
Hello,
I will very probably study medicine for the WS. The subject corresponds exactly to my interests, but I have two other concerns that concern me.

1- The working hours. I have concerns about not being able to endure 60+ h weeks and a lot of overtime. Of course you work more than normal in academic professions, but I would like to know how things have developed in recent years. Is it possible to get humane working hours regardless of the subject or is it still rather rare? Are overtime paid or dumped or are there still houses that do not allow that at all? Is it possible to work part-time as a man?

2- I have no problem seeing blood. I also go to surgery sometimes, simply because I find it so interesting, but somehow I can't imagine taking blood or putting a CVC. Sounds stupid, I know, but I also belong to those people who tend to have a restless hand and think that you can cause a lot of damage to CVCs. Is the thought justified? Are there people who, from the practical point of view, are not made for it at all?

3- Practices are apparently no longer wanted politically, are MVZs a good long-term alternative or are appearances deceptive?

a person seeking advice
aldante  📅 06.01.2018 09:22:34
From Nemo-. Is it possible to get humane working hours regardless of the subject or is it still rather rare? Are overtime paid or dumped or are there still houses that do not allow that at all? Is it possible to work part-time as a man?

You can - in my opinion in most subjects. Except maybe in extreme subjects like heart surgery. Still, most surgeons, internists, neurologists, etc. clear work more than most ophthalmologists, dermatologists, laboratory doctors, or pathologists

Overtime depends on the company, and yes, there are still enough departments in which you have to work overtime but are not allowed to write it down.

Working part-time as a man is certainly possible (I also know a handful of people), but very rarely and IMHO can quickly have a negative impact on your career. At least I would not recommend it as a resident doctor.

From Nemo-. Is the thought justified? Are there people who, from the practical point of view, are not made for it at all?

It can always what happens. Many medical students have such thoughts, and many senior physicians also quickly get nervous when placing the CVC. If it calms you down: you will never have to do a CVC in medical studies - maybe you will have the opportunity to do it voluntarily under guidance during an internship or in the PJ, but no one will force you to do it. As an internal resident, things look different, of course, so you don't have a choice anymore.

From Nemo-. Doctors are apparently no longer wanted politically, are MVZs a good long-term alternative or are appearances deceptive?

MVZ are IMHO only good for MVZ owners - they can gild the less bureaucracy and organization that is nice The salaries are mostly much lower than the net profit if you are established yourself.
Nemo-.  📅 06.01.2018 11:15:34
From aldante
From Nemo-. Is it possible to get humane working hours regardless of the subject or is it still rather rare? Are overtime paid or dumped or are there still houses that do not allow that at all? Is it possible to work part-time as a man?

You can - in my opinion in most subjects. Except maybe in extreme subjects like cardiac surgery. Still, most surgeons, internists, neurologists, etc. clear work more than most ophthalmologists, dermatologists, laboratory doctors, or pathologists

Overtime depends on the company, and yes, there are still enough departments in which you have to work overtime but are not allowed to write it down.

Working part-time as a man is certainly possible (I also know a handful of people), but very rarely and IMHO can quickly have a negative impact on your career. At least I would not recommend it as a resident doctor.

From Nemo-. Is the thought justified? Are there people who, from the practical point of view, are not made for it at all?

It can always happening. Many medical students have such thoughts, and many senior physicians also quickly get nervous when placing the CVC. In case it calms you down: You will never have to do a CVC in medical studies - maybe you will have the opportunity to do it voluntarily under supervision during an internship or in the PJ, but nobody will force you to do it. As an internal resident, things look different, of course, so you don't have a choice anymore.

From Nemo-. Doctors are apparently no longer wanted politically, are MVZs a good long-term alternative or are appearances deceptive?

MVZ are IMHO only good for MVZ owners - they can gild the less bureaucracy and organization that is nice The salaries are mostly much lower than the net profit if you are established yourself.
What about the gyn, for example?

How often do you change the AG? Then you have to move all the time ..?

I wouldn't do part-time, especially as an AA, but if I can't anymore, then I can't either. Can you only justify part-time work by having children?
I also don't want to have a career and become an OA, I already know that.

yes, the salaries are lower in this regard, but are they justified? For me, one reason would be to be employed there because you have a regular working day, of course there is still overtime, but that's different. In addition, I am not afraid of self-employment, the financial risk and a fan of business management contexts.
theoretically that would be a good option or not? What fluctuations can one expect in the east (or also in general)? Do you know what about it?
Medical student  📅 06.01.2018 18:48:20
I am still a med student and would like to briefly describe my experiences so far.
Looking back at first, I definitely wouldn't study medicine anymore. If you want to make a career and don't want to end up in a rehab facility later on, you definitely have at least a 50h + week, night shifts, on-call duty. Your job actually permeates and determines your entire private life. As an assistant doctor, there are only fixed-term contracts at university hospitals and popular areas in particular do not have a shortage of applicants in larger cities. In addition, you have to reach the clinic within a certain time during the on-call duty, so you will have to move your place of residence near the clinic. Commuting is almost impossible as a doctor. One should actually think that such restrictions on the quality of life are at least adequately compensated, but this is not the case. As a doctor you usually have a very good Abitur (except for the waiting semester), the highest possible level of education (Dr. or Prof.), lousy working hours, overtime, you have enormous responsibility and a limited choice of place of residence. Almost all of my business administration and engineering friends had a higher starting salary with a bachelor's degree than I will have later (Bavaria, greater Nuremberg area) namely around 60k with 35h hours, flextime and unlimited. After completing my studies in 3 years, I will start with around 55k as a basic salary, numerous unpaid overtime, with some services I will eventually come to 65k. Meanwhile, the business graduates and engineers will already have their first promotions and earn at least as much. Careers can certainly be made more pleasant and easier in the private sector. You mustn't indulge in the idea that after your internship, your work-life balance will tend to get better, as a specialist you will have on-call services and on-call duty, as well as a senior physician, here the workload is sometimes even higher, because of the on-call duty and the responsibility for the assistants, even some chief physicians still have on-call duty.
Regarding the branch office, it can be said that realistically you can not settle down before you are 35 (18-24 studies, 24-30 specialist, 30-35 gain experience, possibly senior physician activity). Especially the lucrative branches (radiology, surgical ophthalmology, orthopedics) are becoming more and more difficult to reach because of the MVZ. As a general practitioner, the workload will be similar to that of the clinic, with similar earnings.

My conclusion: don't be dazzled by the high NC and the alleged prestige. If I could turn back the time again, I would do a dual business administration course at a local DAX company. Ultimately, you ask yourself why you do the whole thing, spend half a week in the library, cheat certificates through sometimes nasty anatomy, then 60 hours a week in the university clinic.
aldante  📅 06.01.2018 19:16:40
From medical student If you want to make a career and don't want to end up in a rehab facility later on, you definitely have at least a 50h + week, night shifts, on-call duty.

That is totally wrong.

From medical student As an assistant doctor, there are only fixed-term contracts at university hospitals ...

That is also wrong.


From medical student ... and popular areas in particular have no shortage of applicants in larger cities.

That is only correct to a very limited extent.

From medical student In addition, you have to reach the clinic within a certain time during the on-call duty, so you will have to move your place of residence near the clinic. Commuting is almost impossible as a doctor.

That is also wrong. Firstly, there are many specialist medical specialties without any on-call duty, secondly, on-call duty usually only plays a role as a senior physician, and thirdly, depending on the subject, you don't have that little time until you have to be there.

From medical student Almost all of my business administration and engineering friends had a higher starting salary with a bachelor's degree than I will later have (Bavaria, greater Nuremberg area) namely around 60k with 35h hours, flextime and unlimited. After completing my studies in 3 years, I will start with around 55k as a basic salary, numerous unpaid overtime, with some services I will eventually come to 65k. Meanwhile, the business graduates and engineers will already have their first promotions and earn at least as much. Careers can certainly be made more pleasant and easier in the private sector.

That is totally wrong. Because only a small minority of all business economists and engineers start with € 60k, and very few business economists and engineers will ever earn what any senior physician earns automatically without having to make a "career".

From medical student ... as a specialist you will also have on-call duty and on-call duty, as well as a senior physician, here the workload is sometimes even higher because of the on-call duty and the responsibility for the assistants, even some chief physicians are still on call.

That is wrong in this generality. There are enough specialist courses without any willingness.

From medical student ... then 60 hours a week in the university clinic.

This only applies to a minority of all university clinic doctors.