Can you actually read Russian in italics?

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I am russian

written by: Olesja 2000 ()

Date: December 07, 2010 5:21 pm


Dear German teachers,

could you please tell me if this is correct:

I am russian

is that what you say when you talk about nationality?


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Re: I am Russian

written by: suzana guoth ()

Date: December 07, 2010 6:15 pm


Hello Olesja!
They say: I am Russian.
A man would say: I am Russian.
He's Russian, she's Russian.
With best regards
Charlotte


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Re: I am Russian

written by: huangdi ()

Date: December 07, 2010 18:43


Olesja,

if you want to designate a person's nationality in German, you always have to use the following sentence pattern:

Subject nouns + SEIN + predictive nouns
(A) (B) (C)

For example:
A = he / she
B = is
C = Russian (if it's a man), Russian (if it's a woman).

In the plural, however, the gender is sometimes differentiated, sometimes not:

Are you Russians, are you Russians?

(if it is a group of women and men from Russia or just a male group from Russia).

If, on the other hand, it is a group of women from Russia, one can also say:

You are RussInside, they are RussInside.

The sentence pattern

Subject noun + SEIN + adjective predicate

as in the sentence

I am russian

however, you cannot use it; that would be grammatically wrong.

Hopefully that will help a little.

There is nothing that is really nothing, because even nothing is also something - namely "nothing".


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Re: I am Russian

written by: jero ()

Date: December 07, 2010 7:39 PM


... what comes to my mind:

In official documents, almost everyone enters "German" as their nationality. Wouldn't it be better to enter: German / German?

jero
[katzensprung.blog.de]


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Re: I am Russian

written by: Franziska ()

Date: December 07, 2010 7:55 pm


No: The documents asks for your nationality, namely the adjective. So "Russian" would also be correct. Not the person is Russian or German, but their nationality.


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Re: I am Russian

written by: Olesja 2000 ()

Date: December 07, 2010 10:48 PM


Exactly, it's grammatically wrong, I know that too. But I've already heard something like this from native speakers (also from people with university degrees):

Are you Russian?

so I ask you whether something like that will also be used?

Otherwise, thank you for your answers


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Re: I am Russian

written by: Franziska ()

Date: December 07, 2010 11:10 PM


You know, Olesja, we don't actually use the adjective "Russian" or "German" like that - normally. But I like to believe you that some people say that! Sometimes the speaker then moves away from the actual meaning. If someone says: "He is very German", then it has
for example the meaning that it has many "typically German" characteristics, whatever that may be.
I recommend you to use the noun form "Russin"!
Incidentally, it also happens that Germans, when they speak to foreigners, suddenly speak worse than usual. Maybe that's why they ask: Are you Russian? Your answer is best:
Yes i'm russian Or: No, I'm Ukrainian, German, Spanish, Japanese ...



Edited 1 time. Last on 12/7/10 11:14 PM.


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Re: I am Russian

written by: huangdi ()

Date: December 08, 2010 12:09 am


Quote

"He is very German",


This then relates to certain character traits of a person that are considered typically German (not the person, but the said traits).

You can also say: "That is typically German" ... and that is not always meant to be flattering!

There is nothing that is really nothing, because even nothing is also something - namely "nothing".

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Re: I am Russian

written by: jero ()

Date: December 08, 2010 8:16 am


Quote
Franziska
Incidentally, it also happens that Germans, when they speak to foreigners, suddenly speak worse than usual. Maybe that's why they ask: Are you Russian?


Yes, it really is. I just wouldn't call it "bad German"denote. It is actually a (wrong)"Accommodating". One adapts to the supposed language level of the other and believes that this means that one is better understood.

Something similar happens to "us" with small children and babies. We imitate "baby language" almost automatically (not everyone of course). I have friends who think that's terrible and "ingrown" about me; now they told me that some kindergarten teacher or something (?) had told them that it was the unconscious effort to meet the toddler in order to be with him "in his language"to be able to communicate better.

jero
[katzensprung.blog.de]

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Re: I am Russian

written by: jero ()

Date: December 08, 2010 8:25 am


Quote
Franziska
No: The documents ask for nationality, namely for the adjective. So "Russian" would also be correct. Not the person is Russian or German, but their nationality.


You couldTo be right. But it also seems to me to be the question of how I understand / interpret these "key points". Since no native speaker speaks according to the motto "I - nationality - German", you formulate it in your mind a complete sentence: "My nationality is German"(although that sounds strange to me) or"I am of German nationality"(works, but looks very formal, doesn't it?).

For example, if it says "Married status", then I also write "married" because I formulate the answer in my mind "I am married" and not "My marital status is married"or"I am married"* chuckle *. So maybe I can think behind the key point" nationality ":"I am ..."and then you should actually write" German / German ", which sounds" more natural "to me.

(See also the answer to questions about height, age etc., the answers are actually not attributes of the respective noun, but separate sentences, mostly "I am ...".)

Or?

jero
[katzensprung.blog.de]

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Re: I am Russian

written by: Franziska ()

Date: December 08, 2010 3:18 pm


Sure: Nobody will be chalked up if you write "German" as a nationality.


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Re: I am Russian

written by: cxyrz ()

Date: December 08, 2010 18:39


Since it is an oral statement (by a native speaker), combined with the question to the forum about the correctness of the same, what has been said could perhaps be supplemented by a consideration of a logical nature.
An interpretation of this statement with an evaluative intention on the basis of the categories right / wrong leads to the irritation of the questioner insofar as the only statement that can be made about something that is is that it is. A statement about how something is, e.g. right or wrong, only emerges from the perspective of the beholder.
I find it interesting that you come across a typical response pattern for this type of question. First, the conventions of written utterances are used to evaluate the conventions of oral utterances - and thus formal categories are related to action-oriented categories. The formal categories then serve as a reference for the distinction between right and wrong, whereby the following applies: if a = right, then A = wrong. So that "Are you Russian?" is not wrong with regard to any other distinguishing feature, as Olesja's contribution shows - she understood the question.


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Re: I am Russian

written by: jero ()

Date: December 08, 2010 7:37 PM


Quote

Since it is an oral statement (by a native speaker), combined with the question to the forum about the correctness of the same, what has been said could perhaps be supplemented by a consideration of a logical nature.
An interpretation of this statement with an evaluative intention on the basis of the categories right / wrong leads to the irritation of the questioner insofar as the only statement that can be made about something that is is that it is. A statement about how something is, e.g. right or wrong, only emerges from the perspective of the beholder.
I find it interesting that you come across a typical response pattern for this type of question. First, the conventions of written utterances are used to evaluate the conventions of oral utterances - and thus formal categories are related to action-oriented categories. The formal categories then serve as a reference for the distinction between right and wrong, whereby the following applies: if a = right, then A = wrong. So that "Are you Russian?" is not wrong with regard to any other distinguishing feature, as Olesja's contribution shows - she understood the question.


Hello,

could you please express it a little more understandably? I don't really know now what that should mean in relation to my statements, for example. Advocate, contradict, or does it not relate to it at all?

jero
[katzensprung.blog.de]

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Re: I am Russian

written by: Franziska ()

Date: December 08, 2010 10:49 PM


By the way, cxyrz: The fact that Olesja understood the question is not yet proof that it is "correct", whether conventional or colloquial. Even the fact that native speakers have provided it does not automatically upgrade a formulation. If the question is like the one in our case (is that correct?), Then we should deal with it - and definitely compare what has been said with what is stipulated in the sets of rules. But if the question is:
Can you say that too? So the answer is different! Because say you can really do a lot.
Olesja really just wanted to know how to talk about nationalities - and Charlotte had adequately answered this question at the very beginning.

(I hear strange expressions every day in the subway that I don't want my learners to expect - but that's how it is spoken, no question.)


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Re: I am Russian

written by: suzana guoth ()

Date: December 9, 2010 12:17 AM


Thank you Franziska for your opinion.
best regards
Charlotte


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Re: I am Russian

written by: jero ()

Date: December 9, 2010 8:53 am


Good Morning,

on that occasion I remind us all of them Prague schooland the Theory of the center and the periphery(I found it very simple at the time during my studies, but still very applicable) and also because language is not mathematics. Thank god! ;-)

Quote
Unfortunately, more details were not found on the fly
Periphery & # 8211; Wiktionary
Sept. 25, 2010 ... For such cases, linguistics developed the theory of center and periphery. (This theory comes from the Prague School.) ...
de.wiktionary.org/wiki/Peripherie - Cached - Similar pages


jero
[katzensprung.blog.de]



Edited 1 time. Last on 12/9/10 9:01 AM.

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Re: I am Russian

written by: cxyrz ()

Date: December 09, 2010 4:16 pm


I had less of a discussion of the better variant in mind - that is quickly cleared up. I did not refer to a single comment either, but wanted to draw attention to the fact that a paradox is actually being uncovered in the situation described by Olesja. How can something be "wrong" and still be correctly understood? And on the other hand on how it is dealt with, not on the part of the commentators (albeit occasionally this one), but on the part of the questioner herself. The easiest way to cover up this paradox is to mark it as inadmissible or incorrect. The observer thus puts himself in a certain relationship to this statement, but he will not change anything in its functionality.

... and what would be gained with this? Just complementary to the possibility of answering a question with regard to its linguistic correctness, as well as examining it with regard to our assumptions about linguistic correctness - in order to discover something that would otherwise remain hidden.


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Re: I am Russian

written by: jero ()

Date: December 09, 2010 7:04 pm


Quote
cxyrz
How can something be "wrong" and still be correctly understood?


It's relatively easy to explain. Here someone once said so beautifully: We add, correct and interpret what is said to what is meant. That actually applies very well.

Our brain also has this ability in other areas due to hundreds and thousands of experience, To make unclear "clear" (including misunderstandings). During our studies we had such a nice example where we actually only saw lines, but our brain formed a vase out of experience. Anyone who has never seen a vase would not have been able to do so.

Something like that is also available as "teasing fun pictures", where, depending on the perspective, an old or a young woman can be seen etc.-etc.

In this way we can also really understand someone who does not speak / write German correctly.Of course, there are also limits to this. If someone asked "What nationality are you?" replied: "Mine turns green"or"Rain boils wet"or"I'm mad", we would not have been able to do anything with it. Then wrong things would not have been understood correctly either.

jero
[katzensprung.blog.de]



Edited 5 times. Last on 12/9/10 8:54 PM.

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Re: I am Russian

written by: Janek ()

Date: December 11, 2010 12:43 PM


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Edited 1 time. Last on 01/23/11 3:19 PM.


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Please write German only in the forums!
Unfortunately, we also have to delete contributions in foreign languages ​​(i.e. contributions about other languages).