What is your favorite Brazilian food

The 17-page magazine “Culinary Journey through Brazil” offers detailed information on Brazilian cuisine, plus lots of stimulating photos, tips and maps. It was written for you by the travel guide authors. You can download it here for free.

  • The Brazilian national dish is the Feijoada, a thick bean stew with all imaginable meat fillings from pork's foot to Cabanossi-like sausage calabresa. The high-calorie meal is enjoyed with orange pieces and kale and washed down with a glass of sugar cane schnapps or a caipirinha. It is traditional to meet friends and family in a restaurant on Saturdays to eat Feijoada. The gourmet buffet is often accompanied rhythmically by a samba troupe and can drag on for the whole afternoon. Tip: Definitely try it out, preferably in Rio!

  • Especially in Rio and São Paulo, but also in other major Brazilian cities, creative top chefs serve the very best Haute cuisinethat doesn't have to hide behind the European crème de la crème. Tip: Use the advantageous exchange rate and go on excursions into the world of top Brazilian gastronomy! A reservation is often essential.
  • The high-proof Brazilian sugar cane brandy Aguardente de Cana, better known as Cachaça, has long been known in Europe for the refreshing lime cocktail Caipirinha. It was created as a by-product of sugar production in the 16th century. It was only later that the systematic production process for sugar cane brew was found, which is fermented and distilled and then has to mature. There are excellent cachaças that are revered by connoisseurs in the same way as good whiskeys. Tip:Those who like high-quality spirits can taste their way into the world of top cachaças, the best in the country come from Paraty, Minas Gerais and Pernambuco. If that's too strong for you, you can stick to the delicious sweet liqueurs.
  • The slightly sweet water of the green coconut which is offered directly from the ice-cold nut in beach bars and at special kiosks in the cities, is part of the daily refreshment for most tourists. Água de Coco is also revered as a stomach comfort or with a hangover. Tip:If the stomach area is slightly upset, do like the Brazilians and try a coconut water cure.

  • Freshness Fruit juices are available almost everywhere in Brazil - they are often pressed from the fruit on the spot, but sometimes also made from frozen fruit pulp (polpa). You can easily tell which juices are really freshly squeezed by the fruits that are hung over the counter. Tip: For European taste the juices are usually too heavily sugared, as a precaution one should order weakly (“com pouco açúcar”) or not at all sweetened (“sem açúcar”).
  • Fruit juices Second: In addition to well-known things such as orange or pineapple (especially refreshing with mint as a abacaxi com hortelã), there are plenty of unknowns to discover among the local fruits. Tip: Try as many tropical fruit juices as possible: Graviola, Mangaba, Cupuaçu (wild cocoa), Acerola (the fruits of the West Indian cherry are among those with the highest vitamin C content), Umbu, Caju or Cajá are just some of the many juices that there is to be discovered in Brazil.
  • Where we already at Fruits are: In Rio de Janeiro you can meet a popular Brazilian Fruit Tasting Session connect. Locals introduce the world of Brazilian fruits to one of Rio's many markets. Visitors can nibble through the most delicious tropical fruits for two hours and receive explanations in English or German.

  • If you want to eat cheaply, you can order a dish of the day in many restaurants for lunch under the name Prato Feito (abbreviated: PF), or “Prato Executivo” or “Prato Comercial” is offered. In contrast to the usual portions in a restaurant, a Prato Feito is only ever intended for one person. It usually consists of rice, noodles, beans and lettuce, with “proteína” either meat, poultry or fish. Tip: If you want to take the whole thing packaged with you, order a “Quentinha”.
  • The dessert is almost always followed by the “small coffee”, the Cafezinho. It's one of the greatest Brazilian inventions. The strong, usually very strongly sweetened espresso is drunk at any time of the day. After eating it is free in many restaurants, but it is also offered free of charge in thermos flasks in shops, travel agencies, yoga schools, etc. The Cafezinho can definitely be described as a kind of national drink, which is also a synonym for the Brazilian way of life: Just take a breather, relax for a few minutes from the hectic everyday life and relax with a chat. The Cafezinho is also a symbol of hospitality.

  • There are numerous eateries in all varieties and price ranges. For the appetite in between, offer simple ones on almost every street corner Lanchonetes (Snack bars) or stalls selling fresh juices and sandwiches - or something more typical of the country such as filled manioc pancakes (tapioca), filled dumplings fried in oil (pastel) or pies filled with chicken fricassee or shrimp paste (empadas). Tip: Try it out on one Coxinha, these are crispy fried dumplings in a tear-like shape that are filled with chopped or shredded chicken. The “chicken legs” are perfect for a small snack in between.
  • The better bars and pubs are called Botecos orMessengers, They have two faces: during the day they often offer inexpensive daily specials, usually two or three standard dishes. In the evening the selection is reduced, then there are snacks such as carne-de-sol acebolada com farofa (salted meat with onions and cassava flour), bolinhos de bacalhau (cod balls), batatas fritas (french fries), aipim frito (baked cassava, in in some parts of the country also known as Macaxeira or Mandioca) and much more. Tip: You don't necessarily have to have dinner in a restaurant before going out, almost all good botecos have an excellent menu.

  • For meat lovers, including the Brazilians, there are the popular ones Churrascarias (Grill restaurants). Here the waiters come to the table every minute with new meat skewers and various fresh meats and you can eat as much as you want. This serving method is called Rodízio. Warm side dishes such as rice, onion rings or French fries are ordered separately and are included in the fixed price, as is a large and excellently stocked salad and cheese buffet. If you don't like meat: Often there is also grilled fish and in better houses sushi. It is customary to go to a churrascaria on a Sunday and make this visit the only meal of the day, as you have to be rolled out afterwards. As a result, prices are also higher on Sunday. Tip: The waiter only brings the finest pieces when the guests have already filled their stomachs with the less noble pastries, side dishes, sausages and other pieces of meat. Connoisseurs refuse everything offered for at least the first four rounds and wait until it is Picanha (tail piece) and Filé Mignon ...
  • Especially in São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, the Brazilian ones are so typical Churrascarias widespread. The excellent is one of the best in the country Churrascaria Palace in Rio, just a few steps from the legendary Copacabana Palace Hotel. Thanks to the lavish side-dish buffet, it is also an experience for vegetarians. Tip: Almost every vacationer in Brazil visits a Churrascaria (at least) once on their trip. If Rio is on your route, this top restaurant should be included in the program on one of the evenings.

  • The Rodízio system Incidentally, it is not only used in meat restaurants in Brazil. Some restaurants offer a rodízio every day or on certain days of the week consisting of different types of pizza and / or pasta dishes, variations of crab or seafood, cheese or desserts. There are no limits to the imagination of the restaurant owner. Tip: Such rodizios are often delicious and inexpensive, just pay attention to the notices and try them out.

  • The ones served in Brazilian restaurants Servings are usually quite generous, a single dish is - if you are moderately hungry - often enough for two people. Correspondingly, in the widespread dishes that are intended for two people (“para duas pessoas”), it is not uncommon for a third eater to be satisfied. However, the better and more expensive the restaurant, the greater the likelihood that the noble creations will be portioned more sparingly, i.e. actually only for one person. Tip: If you are traveling as a couple, in most restaurants below the top category it is almost always sufficient to order one dish plus a salad or side dish and share it. Besides you, your stomach is hanging straight in the hollow of your knee.
  • No matter where you eat: 10 percentTipare almost always included in the final price. In addition to that, you don't need to give anything. Tip: Coins shouldn't be left on the table, this is not common in Brazil.
  • In the manyKilo restaurants everyone can fill their plate at the buffet as they wish. Payment is almost always based on weight (“comida a quilo”). Tip: Don't be late. Those who visit the kilo restaurants only towards the end of lunchtime often only encounter a grazed buffet.
  • One variant is the All-you-can-eat restaurants (“Buffet livre”). Here, too, a large buffet awaits the guests, but a flat rate is paid and everyone can help themselves as often as they want. The mixed form is less common, in which the guest can choose whether he would prefer to pay a flat rate or pay by weight. Tip: Since you serve yourself, no tip is usually charged in self-service restaurants (at most on the drinks served at the table).

  • Vegetarian or vegan restaurants, or even organic restaurants, are only very sparsely represented in Brazil; they are most likely to be found in the major state capitals. Outside of the big cities, however, they are practically unknown. Tip: The ubiquitous buffet restaurants are ideal for vegetarians, vegans and flexitarians, there are always plenty of salads and fresh vegetables from local varieties such as Chuchú and Quiabo to internationally known cauliflower and broccoli. As a starch supplement, you can choose between potatoes, rice, pasta, casseroles, fish, omelets or egg dishes, so that even the most hungry vegetarian is reliably satisfied.
  • The cuisine of the Amazon is determined by the Abundance of fishof the great rivers. Particularly recommended are Tucunaré (a species of cichlid) and Pirarucu (Arapaima, one of the largest freshwater fish ever) and of course Tambaqui (millstone tetra), the flagship on the plates in the Amazon. The notorious piranha is also one of the food fish. The guests of the numerous jungle hotels can catch it themselves on an excursion and have it prepared for dinner. Tip: It is essential to order a tambaqui in Manaus, it is usually served in its entirety and, together with the various side dishes (rice, beans, salad, farofa ...) makes a family full.

  • Typical of the Amazon cuisine are also the many indigenous, sometimes endemic plants and fruits as well as the recipes of the indigenous and other river-edge inhabitants. The palm fruit AçaíFor example, known among athletes as a sweet, semi-frozen power meal, its original version in the state of Pará belongs to fish dishes as a slightly salty, lukewarm fruit pulp. Açaí should never be missing as an accompaniment to seafood, chicken or meat plates around the city of Belém. Tip: Açaí is most common as a sweet fruit puree with banana slices and muesli. The best thing to do is to test it out at the beginning of the trip, as it is very likely that you will become addicted to it.

  • In the state BahiaWhere the largest slave port used to be, the African influences and the proportion of marine animals in the dishes are greatest. Many of the Bahian dishes have their origins in the candomblé, the religious mixture of Christian and African traditions. For example, the baianos' favorite snack, the Acarajé, which originally represented a ritual meal for the goddess Iansã: small round cakes made from ground white beans, deep-fried in palm oil and served with tomato, onion, smoked mini shrimp and vatapá (a sauce made from fish, crabs, spices, soaked bread and other ingredients) is filled. Acarajé balls are freshly prepared by women in traditional robes at street stalls everywhere, especially in Salvador. Tip: Be careful when the seller asks whether you want it “hot” (quente), it's not about temperatures, but about how much of the hellishly hot chili sauce to put on it.

  • The fish stew Moqueca de Peixe is a dish that is particularly typical of Bahia and Espírito Santo and has long been known throughout the country. The peculiarity of the Bahian Moqueca is that fish and seafood are cooked in a clay pot with coconut milk and seasoned with the oil of the dendê palm; Onions, garlic, tomatoes, coriander and salt complete the taste. Often crabs are also added to the whole thing, in which case the dish “com camarão e peixe” is ordered. Tip: If you prefer something more stomach-friendly, that is, without palm oil, ask for an “ensopado”.

  • If you don't just want to enjoy Brazilian cuisine passively, you can attend a four-hour workshop in Copacabana Cook in Rio occupy. In a cozy show kitchen, cookery students are introduced to the secrets of Brazilian culinary art in English and together they prepare a five-course Brazilian menu and two drinks. At the caipirinha, the guest-friendly motto “All you can make (and drink…)” applies, so it's fun. All the necessary ingredients are included in the course price.

  • You can download the detailed magazine “Culinary Journey through Brazil” with information on Brazilian cuisine on 17 pages for free.