Where do you go to church

Which church do you actually go to?

February 16, 2011 Congregation / Congregation

Manuel Seibel

Hans goes to the Catholic Church. Eva in the evangelical. Marlies in the free congregation, Ralf in the assembly. And you?

Which church do you actually go to? And why? I don't go to any church myself. Not even in any church. Not even in a meeting. Why not?

What does the Bible "understand" by church?

The Bible actually speaks of a church. 1 The terms church, congregation, and congregation are usually used for the same content. Depending on which translation of the Bible is used, one of the three words appears. In this short essay, I use "church" because it is the best known of the three words. The Greek word "ekklesia" means called out. It seems to me that the term "assembly" fits this best. In Ephesians 5 verse 25 it says: "Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her." Here, church ’can hardly be used to mean a place. Not a building either. Because the Lord Jesus did not give himself up for a building. But for people. We read that, for example, in the second verse of the same chapter. Does that mean that by Church ’a person is meant? That in turn is not enough! The Church includes all to whom the fact described in the above verse applies: Jesus Christ gave himself up for them. That means quite simply: If you believe in the Lord Jesus that he died for YOU, especially for YOUR sins, then you belong to the church. So the church does not consist of dead stones, but of living people, of you and me and every believing Christian.

Well, then I don't go to the Protestant church, but we are them. And you are the Catholic ... In fact, one never finds a distinction in the Word of God between different churches. Paul persecuted the church (1 Corinthians 15), even the Lord Jesus did not die for different churches. From this we see that the division of Christianity into different churches is a purely human differentiation. There is only one church for God, his! This undoubtedly has different foundations than human institutions. The above-mentioned section from Ephesians 5 is an essential basis. But, and this is the decisive factor, people from all human "churches" can belong to his church; they always belong precisely when they believe in Jesus Christ. Do you believe in him

Then are the human institutions of the churches wrong?

Indeed, in some places in the Bible it seems that the church is a place after all. For example, there is talk of "in the church". Now, where should the people who belong to the Church in the sense of the Bible meet? In one place, of course. Since there were no different "churches" at the beginning of Christianity, one could also simply send a letter to the church in Rome, for example. It was clear, not the Jews, not the city council, no, the Christians there it had to be brought. And everyone was there too; all who believed in the Lord Jesus in Rome. Today you will no longer find these people alone in one place. Because in the Catholic, in the Protestant, in ..., they are everywhere, scattered. Pity!

Yes, then we have to finish the ecumenical movement quickly, then we have everyone together. Really? All those who believe in the Lord Jesus? And just that too?

‘Church’, a difficult subject, of which only a few thoughts are touched upon here.

‘Church’, a sad subject because it only shows our own mistakes.

‘Church’, a wonderful topic because it makes Jesus Christ and his death, his resurrection and his ascension so important. ‘Church’, are you one of them?


‘Church’, which one do you actually go to?


Footnotes:

1 The terms church, congregation, and congregation are usually used for the same content. Depending on which translation of the Bible is used, one of the three words appears. In this short essay, I use "church" because it is the best known of the three words. The Greek word "ekklesia" means called out. It seems to me that the term "assembly" fits this best.