Why do Swedes like to buy Volvo cars?

Own import from Sweden

Hello everyone,

I would like to buy my new Volvo in Sweden and then drive to Germany and import it.

However, the question arises as to how the import is possible. I currently see the problem of the transfer in the fact that there is no insurance for the Swedish export license plate in Germany. Or has someone already found one?

As an alternative, I had read here that you can register the vehicle in Germany normally and pay the import taxes with the vehicle documents sent by the Swedish dealer and the sales contract. Then you take the German license plates and can take the car from Sweden to Germany. However, the authorities say that the vehicle must be presented in Germany.

Does anyone already have experience and can explain how the process works safely?

Best wishes

Martin

Best answer on the topic

Hello, I am now writing to you my collected experiences ...

It was a new Toyota car, December 2015. The brand shouldn't play a role in the import procedure. My prerequisite is that my wife is Swedish, that I can speak the language too, that we have a holiday home and relatives there, etc. The self-import paid off for me, the savings were around 3,000 €.

Seller:

A seller must be found who is ready to sell for export. For the seller it is an additional effort and also a bit of risk. Our salesman knows my brother-in-law and he insisted that my wife sign the sales contract. Of course she has a Swedish person number, which plays a role there. The VAT is due in the country where the first registration takes place. Nevertheless, it was somehow the case that the seller initially had to pay the Swedish VAT, our seller advanced it and received the amount back from the state when he had the confirmation of my VAT payment in Germany. In our case, however, it was a small dealer (Toyota agency) who did this for the first time. Can of course be different elsewhere.

Overpass:

It's really complicated. It is possible to get a German short-term registration for 5 days with the copy (e-mail) of the vehicle documents and COC paper. Insurance exists through the eVB number from the German insurer. But: it is clearly written that only export abroad with this number is permitted, not for import. There is a Swedish short-term approval. This is a bit more complex to get, at least it takes a week to process. There it is clearly regulated that the confirmation must be available from a German insurer. I asked four German insurers about this, all of whom refused to insure a foreign short-term license (WGV, Axa, Signal-Iduna, Gerling). I also tried to send the authorities the German confirmation (eVB number), then the question came that they were expecting a confirmation with an explicit designation of the Swedish short-term approval. So that didn't work. This is how I solved it: I obtained the German short-term registration and license plates for the journey from the ferry to home, which is also permitted. Then it was about 150 km to the ferry. The trailer transport would have been possible for this. Our friendly dealer lent me a test drive license plate and I took it to the ferry. That was pure concession. We drove back to Sweden 5 days later, and I returned the license plate.

German authorization:

The problem started in Sweden. I kept saying to the seller "... you mustn't register the car under any circumstances, because the VAT is due where it is first registered ..." (Germany 19%, Sweden 25%). The Swedes have a different license plate system, every car has a fixed license plate. At Toyota it was the case that the Swedish license plate was assigned when the car arrived at the importer in Stockholm, the seller (dealership) was entered here. So when the car got to the dealer it already had the Swedish license plate. According to the Swedish understanding, this is just a pre-registration. But in the international system, which is also accessed by the German registration office, this entry appears as a daily registration according to the German understanding. So in the first German letter (issued by the German registration office) I was included as the second owner. That had to be clarified with a letter to the registration office, which had to clarify the matter with Sweden through an authority in Berlin. The entry in the letter was then corrected.

When the vehicle was registered, it was checked that the vehicle identification number was correct. The registration of an imported vehicle is only possible upon presentation of the vehicle. The COC paper is required for approval, which the seller receives from the importer (confirms compliance with the technical requirements within the EU).

Payment and VAT:

I paid the net amount in Sweden. I then had to pay the German VAT to the tax office. The tax office also receives information from the registration office about the import of a new vehicle.

Similar issues
33 answers

There are road traffic authorities that insist on a demonstration of the car. Others, on the other hand, probably not, so I would ask "your" office how they are currently handling it, regardless of what they say on the Internet.

A colleague here from Gelsenkirchen probably had to have the car come from Sweden on a trailer because the office in GE had insisted on the demonstration. So there is probably a residual risk ...

Short-term license plates are now (partially) recognized abroad, some write in the EU, the ADAC expresses itself unclearly with reference to an EU change in 2015. However, it is expressly pointed out that picking up a vehicle from abroad is therefore an "inadmissible remote registration". : eek:

However, it seems to work often - my RRS was transferred to Romania with Luxembourgish license plates).

I would a) phone the road traffic office to see if a registration without a vehicle is possible. If so, which documents do you need.

b) Call the ADAC if you are a member - use free legal advice.

Best regards

Jürgen

I imported a new vehicle from S in Dec 2015. Swedish abbreviation does not work wg. VS as written. German abbreviation does not work abroad when importing -> You have to solve it how you get the car to the ferry. I had solved that and mounted the German short-term license plates on the ferry. I was able to get it beforehand with a copy of the vehicle documents. If the registration was correct, the chassis number was checked, so only works with the vehicle. The entry as the first owner was still difficult, because the Swedes make an assignment of the license plate for every new vehicle, as it goes to the dealer, a day's registration resulted. That was corrected, but it was a bit complicated ... It was a lot of work, actually only possible because my wife is Swedish and we were also a little lucky with a very courteous salesperson ...

May you ask what difference you have to pay on site in Sweden to the German list price?

The price depends on the offers and the current exchange rate. Can be cheaper, was very interesting a pasr years ago. But I found the Volvo prices that I saw in December to be as high as ours. The exception was a little equipped S60 petrol engine for the equivalent of € 28,000, which I found interesting. If the vehicle is first registered in Germany, the VAT difference is saved, 25 to 19%. The payment processing has to be solved. In S, as far as I know, there are no transportation costs for new cars, that's also a pasr euro.

That means I should try it in the order:

1. Ask at the local registration office whether the vehicle needs to be presented.

2. Ask the dealer if he will allow it to go to the dealership. Then have a German transfer number plate with you and mount it on the ferry.

3. Carry out transfer by a forwarding agent.

I had read that (http://www.motor-talk.de/forum/eigenimport-aus-schweden-t2116774.html). The last post on the first page says that you get a German insurance company and get proof of insurance from it. This is then given to the Swedish authorities for a short-term license plate. Is it that easy? The insurance company doesn't want to see the car. The only question is whether the insurance would be liable for an accident if it really did occur.

@digidoctor The price difference is 37,000 € to the list price in Germany of 57,000 €. Currently, Volvo is not going down very much in the list price. In any case, 35% are hopeless.

You misunderstood a few points. I can answer in detail this evening. Here with the smartphone it takes too long.

Maybe not 100% comparable, but in 2011 I picked up my V70 at the factory. The car was registered with an export license for 12 months and a Swedish insurance for 14 days was included. After that I drove around for another 6 months with the Swedish license plates and a German insurance company.

Johan

Hello Johan,

Which insurance did you have in Germany that had no problems with the Swedish license plates?

@SteffenVariant: I'm happy about the exact explanation :)

Best wishes

Martin

Hello, I am writing to you now about my experiences ...

It was a new Toyota car, December 2015. The brand shouldn't play a role in the import procedure. My prerequisite is that my wife is Swedish, that I can speak the language too, that we have a holiday home and relatives there. The self-import paid off for me, the savings were around 3,000 €.

Seller:

A seller must be found who is ready to sell for export. For the seller it is an additional effort and also a bit of risk. Our salesman knows my brother-in-law and he insisted that my wife sign the sales contract. Of course she has a Swedish person number, which plays a role there. The VAT is due in the country where the first registration takes place. Nevertheless, it was somehow the case that the seller initially had to pay the Swedish VAT, our seller advanced it and received the amount back from the state when he had the confirmation of my VAT payment in Germany. In our case, however, it was a small dealer (Toyota agency) who did this for the first time. Can of course be different elsewhere.

Overpass:

It's really complicated. It is possible to get a German short-term registration for 5 days with the copy (email) of the vehicle documents and COC paper. Insurance exists through the eVB number from the German insurer. But: it is clearly written that only export abroad with this number is permitted, not for import. There is a Swedish short-term approval. This is a bit more complex to get, at least it takes a week to process. There it is clearly regulated that the confirmation must be available from a German insurer. I asked four German insurers about this, all of whom refused to insure a foreign short-term license (WGV, Axa, Signal-Iduna, Gerling). I also tried to send the authorities the German confirmation (eVB number), then the question came that they were expecting a confirmation with explicit designation of the Swedish short-term approval. So that didn't work. This is how I solved it: I obtained the German short-term registration and license plates for the journey from the ferry to home, which is also permitted. Then it was about 150 km to the ferry. The trailer transport would have been possible for this. Our friendly dealer lent me a test drive license plate and I took it to the ferry. That was pure concession. We drove back to Sweden 5 days later, and I returned the license plate.

German authorization:

The problem started in Sweden. I kept saying to the seller "... you mustn't register the car under any circumstances, because the VAT is due where it is first registered ..." (Germany 19%, Sweden 25%). The Swedes have a different license plate system, every car has a fixed license plate. At Toyota it was the case that the Swedish license plate was assigned when the car arrived at the importer in Stockholm, the seller (dealership) was entered here. So when the car got to the dealer it already had the Swedish license plate. According to the Swedish understanding, this is just a pre-registration. But in the international system, which is also accessed by the German registration office, this entry appears as a daily registration according to the German understanding. So in the first German letter (issued by the German registration office) I was included as the second owner. That had to be clarified with a letter to the registration office, which had to clarify the matter with Sweden through an authority in Berlin. The entry in the letter was then corrected.

When the vehicle was registered, it was checked that the vehicle identification number was correct. The registration of an imported vehicle is only possible upon presentation of the vehicle. The COC paper is required for approval, which the seller receives from the importer (confirms compliance with the technical requirements within the EU).

Payment and VAT:

I paid the net amount in Sweden. I then had to pay the German VAT to the tax office. The tax office also receives information from the registration office about the import of a new vehicle.

One wonders what politicians mean when they talk about European unification. Currency differences should be the only problem when Europeans do business with one another. So it won't work in the long run.