What is rotten

Lazy

Everyone - or almost everyone - would like to do it, but simply don't have the time. That is bad. Because people need relaxation and sometimes have to be able to be really lazy.

Something is wrong!

To say it in advance: Not every lazy person is lazy; and idlers are not exclusively unemployed people who are unwilling to work. Not at all lazy, but diligent and conscientious, we go to the bottom of the "lazy" and discover that our keyword has nothing to do with "work-shy" or "lazy" or "listless". "Lazy" actually means "stinky", "musty". Lazy describes a condition that has been caused by a chemical process: namely that of decomposition by bacteria.

Since decomposition can affect almost anything, there are tons of bad things to do. Think of food, rotten fruit for example. "A rotten apple makes ten people lazy next to it", the German-language edition of Johann Geiler von Kaisersberg said in 1520. So if you don't pay attention and cut out the rotten spots or throw rotten fruit on the compost heap, they will all rot and be gone. It's like the bad tooth. The lazier the more hardworking the dentist - when you have overcome fear and laziness and go to the practice with big cheeks.

Very lazy

Wood also rots, it smells rotten or musty, wet leaves become slippery, it rots. Standing water can become putrid and tastes accordingly. We don't even want to talk about rotten eggs and their unmistakable smell. Stinking lazy or stinking lazy can be traced back to this context as transferred meanings for the appropriate characterization of a loved one. Before the "stinking laziness" comes normal laziness or everyday laziness. Something rotten doesn't move. The dead fish just as little stirs as the rotting apple that has fallen from the tree.

"Lazy" and "lazy" are words that are used in everyday language to devalue something in the pictorial expression. In general we say: "Something is wrong." We don't know exactly what it is, but we do know that something is wrong, something is wrong. There are lazy compromises, that is, unsatisfactory, not entirely clean agreements. We know the famous lazy excuses that everyone knows are badly made up but still can't be called lies. If we feel that something is wrong with a business, we should stay away from it. When we find that something is wrong here or there; if something is completely or not at all right, we quote Shakespeare and say carefree: "Something is wrong in the state of Denmark". - Hamlet 1st act, 2nd scene.

How do sloths lazy?

But Denmark or Hamlet's laziness has nothing to do with what we mean by idleness or idleness. And as far as the right to be lazy or lazy: We just take it, at least on vacation. There we are, if we can still do it, really lazy, turn into satisfied lazy people and lie on the proverbial lazy skin, are lazy and only talk about the bare minimum.

There is something special about lazy skin and lazy people. "Lazy" is an old word for the thick layer of fungus that covers the putrefactive substances with the rotten skin. "Lazy" sounds nice to someone who has been lying in a hammock for hours, just as an example. The idler, however, is one who is fundamentally work-shy. To put it very badly: someone who stinks of laziness. "Lazy" comes from "vulenzen", which in the Middle High German language meant "to taste rotten". To lazy people it would also be said that this is also the name given to supports for fishing rods and particularly comfortable deck chairs. "What about the sloth?" You ask. Well, it just looks like it.


Questions about the text

Which does ______________ mean lazy in the proper sense?

1. tasty and appetizing

2. safe and sound

3. smelly or moldy

When someone says: "Something is wrong", he means that there ...

1. something is wrong

2. everything is OK

3. something smells bad

Who or what is a slacker?

1. a certain type of hammock

2. a work-shy person

3. a rotten egg

Work order

In the hammock under the palm trees or on the sofa in front of the crackling open fire - how do you like to be lazy? Describe a day when you have nothing to do but relax.

Author: Michael Utz

Editor: Shirin Kasraeian