What is the French word for

Words of French origin

Wolfgang Hamm:

"My grandmother might even be a noble woman, at least as a child I thought she was very posh because she had such strange French expressions that I couldn't understand. For example, she could say Chaise longue, and that meant a completely normal sofa. Of course she always spoke of pavement or on the Chaussée, that was the street. Or expressions like Ceiling. That was actually the ceiling Ceiling, yes, the ceiling upstairs in the room. Yes. Or she could even say Paravant, that was also very strange. A kind of wall protection screen. Paravant."

Kerstin Kilanowski:

"sweet, Bon mot, Chaise longue, Chemisette, pavement. I come from Hessian. My grandma and my mother come from the Wetzlar area. Back then, Hesse was under French occupation for a long time, and that's what I actually grew up with: "He's lying on the floorChaise longue"or" She goes onpavement"Or something like a shirt insert, that Chemisetteis what they say in Hessen. Later I noticed with fun that it actually comes from French and is then a bit corrupted and provided with the Hessian dialect. "

Speaker 1:

Mon Dieu, Dear God, Dialect! Here in Sanssouciparley we are very elegant, natural element en français and entre nous, isn't it, Monsieur Voltaire? German, that's the language of the grooms! But please, who has a soft spot for who’s like it. D’accord, okay. Be every little animal Plaisierchen.

Speaker:

Schöngeist and bon vivant, patron of the arts and science. The German King Friedrich the Great consecrated his castle in 1747 Sanssouci - in German, without worry - in Potsdam. Here he lived the dream of an ideal world, dined with generals and diplomats, devoted himself to music, writing and philosophy. He collected all the works of great philosophers in his library in French. And of course he preferred to have conversations there.

Kerstin Kilanowski:

"For me, French expressions in the German language always mean something courtly, elegant, maybe also slightly suggestive. Then I can think of materials. In other words, materials, like chiffon, satin, or gobelin, that is such an embroidery, also something very elegant, courtly. "

Speaker:

Whether elegant, even courtly, or completely everyday. French words, called Gallicisms, have had their place in the German language for centuries. Speaking of which, by the wayso quite en passant, incidentali, it was already in the middle ages en vogue, modernto cultivate diverse cultural and literary relationships with the French knighthood. The word competition, athletic competition, for example, refers to it. It is from the old French tournelier borrowed, which means something like: let the horses run in circles, take part in the knightly fighting game. (Music recording) But the French language not only had a major influence on German vocabulary in the areas of sports and games. Due to the example of the court under Louis XIV. French enjoyed the highest, especially among the German nobility Prestigious, pardon, Look at. Pleasure, fashion, cuisine, but also diplomacy, politics, law and the military - most of the loan words from the French language come from these areas.

Speaker 2:

ballet, Chic, dessert, warranty, cabinet, plea, bayonet.

Speaker:

The first verbs with the infinitive ending -ieren educated.

Speaker 2:

Engagieren, revengeieren, arrangieren, soupieren, subscribeieren.

Kerstin Kilanowski:

"Delicious food, everything that is elegant, especially fashion. Chic, elegance. There are, for example, handbags, such small bags, which are called Pompadour. Or the lady goes to the hairdresser. Or she has one costume. She may have a skirt over which she has one Chasuble wearing. These are all things that have to do with elegance, with fashion. And of course the food too. If you want to dine really fine, then go to the Soupr. There may be one filet with a sauce."

Speaker 2:

Well, unfortunately I can't afford that often.

Speaker:

Even if you ask your colleague at lunchtime, "Are we going to the canteen together?" uses a French loan word. In the 19th century it still had the meaning of a soldiers' tavern, French cantine, but already in the 18th century it was in Germany in the meaning of Canteen in circulation.

Speaker 2:

Wait a moment. canteen, that's a completely normal German word, and it doesn't sound French at all.

Speaker:

We have Germanized the spelling and pronunciation. Also the garage or wardrobe no longer sound French from a German mouth. Incidentally, both are derived from the French cooker, in safe custodyto take. With words like column or veteran, both from the military language, we do not think that they are of French origin. And the Showcase? Yes, she too is of French origin. The glass furniture in which we prefer to display glasses takes its name from French vitre, Glass pane. Furniture, by the way ...

Speaker 2:

No, don't say it!

Speaker:

... of meuble, Furnishing item. Or warranty, a word from the diplomatic language. It means guarantee, security and is from the French word guaranteed, Informant, derived. It goes without saying that the public prosecutor complies in court plea and the defense attorney pleads on acquittal. Both words are from French, from plaider, negotiate in court, borrowed.

Speaker 2:

And I always thought that French words could be recognized immediately by their pronunciation: boulevard and Road, liaison and Counterpart. Or there are also French expressions such as enfant terrible, someone who breaks convention.

Speaker:

Comme ci, comme approx. Depends on. Sure, we can recognize many words of French origin by their pronunciation. At the endings -eur, -ent or -ee for example. But let's take that one hair stylist. In the meantime, the Germanized spelling with umlaut has also established itself. Anyone would say that hairdressing is a word of French origin. It comes from the French hairdresser, in other words ripple, but in French the hair artist is called hairdresser - Incidentally, we use it as a foreign word. The hairdressing is a French education, probably because hair and beard care has received a strong influence from France since the 17th century. Most of the words in this area are actually borrowed from French: shave, pomade or wig for example.

Speaker 2:

My head is slowly spinning! I have the feeling that the German language consists mainly of French words! Now a few more words come to mind: Perfume. subscription. fricassee. It doesn't stop at all!

Kerstin Kilanowski:

"Strangely enough, there are expressions that have to do with the body. So those waist, the complexion."

Wolfgang Hamm:

"They also say that Visage."

Kerstin Kilanowski:

"Yes, that is now a devaluation."

Wolfgang Hamm:

"And they say that too figure."

Kerstin Kilanowski:

"But figure I think it comes from Italian. "

Wolfgang Hamm:

"Everything French comes from Latin: Figure - figura."

Speaker 1:

Ignorance, laziness and arrogance! That has to be over! I am committed to keeping our German language clean. Where is all this foreign infiltration supposed to lead? From now on I suggest replacing French words with German ones. Our language is rich and expressive! It is finally time we made use of them! Hair curlers instead of hairdressers, stories instead of novels ...

Speaker 2:

Ridiculous! Should I tell my buddy soon: "You, I read a great crime story last week!"?

Speaker:

Friedrich Ludwig Jahn really meant it seriously. Born in 1778, the private tutor, best known to all of us as "gymnastics father" Jahn, was vehemently committed to the eradication of - above all - French foreign words in the German language. He joined the "Berlin Society for the German Language", founded in 1815, which was dedicated to researching and keeping the German language clean. By no means the first association of its kind. As early as the 17th century, the so-called "Fruitful Society" complained about the predominance of Gallicisms.

Speaker 2:

The question arises, of course, why? If it does as chic was to speak French or at least use French words.

Speaker:

German is mainly characterized by Latin and French expressions. It was not until the printing press and Martin Luther's translation of the Bible from Latin into German that a High German written language began to develop. The common people spoke dialect. The academic and university language was Latin. German was not particularly recognized as the language of the people. That is why Luther's translation of the Bible was really revolutionary.

Speaker 2:

So people spoke and taught in Latin at universities, and French was spoken frequently at royal courts.

Speaker 1:

I am one of the first to teach in German. I also wrote my "Critique of Pure Reason" in German. That is unusual, but the students received it with joy.

Speaker:

Immanuel Kant! German as the general educational, business and administrative language did not gain acceptance until the middle of the 18th century, and books and writings in German came onto the market in large numbers. The occupation of the German states by Napoleon brought a real boost: students in particular developed a sense of nationality and their identity through the German language.

Speaker 2:

But now I am exhausted!

Speaker:

In the 19th century, important works were written on the development of the German language and at the beginning of the 20th century it was an important scientific language. It was not until after the Second World War that English began its triumphant advance, which we could no longer catch up. American Way of Life, Hollywood, Elvis Presley! Nowadays many people, not only linguists, complain that the German language is infiltrated with Anglicisms.

Speaker 2:

Cool. Tell me, do you mean if I a little googel can I find more information? I could perhaps find something on the Internet on the subject download. I find it really interesting.

Speaker:

We are flooded with a particularly large number of expressions from the field of computers and the Internet, and you are the best example of how naturally we are already starting to translate them into German. It's short and sweet. Googling for "Check the Google search engine to see if you can find something on a topic". But why do you say download instead of downloading?

Speaker 1:

Call for a speech demo. However, anyone who pursues unlawful and sometimes even immoral politics cannot be a role model. The working group "Language in Politics" therefore calls on all German speakers to use more French loanwords instead of English, i.e. instead of Abstract again Résumé instead of Model again mannequin, instead of ticket again Ticket, maybe even demonstratively computerOrdinator to say and the farewell Adieu also to be cared for in the areas where it is otherwise not in use. In addition, many other French words could be used again more frequently.

Speaker 2:

I actually found that on Google. A language protest against the American intervention in Iraq in 2003. I just don't understand why we should use French instead of English? Ordinator instead of computerNobody here understands that. I always say calculator anyway. Why a ticket when we have a good ticket? And chauffeur? That's the driver!

Speaker:

Perhaps we will only find our way back to German by using the French words. Believe it or not, I recently had a teenager in a recent TV movie d’accord hear say. It was so strange that I wondered why the boy wasn't OK says. It actually appears again en vogue to be able to contrast the many Anglicisms with something French. Thirty years ago we naturally celebrated parties instead of parties, we went to rendezvous instead of to Date and have from boss Salary increase requested, not from boss. Wait a minute, you'll be celebrating again in two years Festivals, have one meeting and demand from Supervisor the long overdue promotion.

Speaker 2:

Okay. I return the favor me from now on by consistently putting German words in my mouth! So: box instead of box or carton, leek instead of leek, wallet instead of Wallet, Tableware instead service, Depri instead of Sadness or sadness.

Speaker:

Ah yes? And what do you say instead French fries with ketchup and mayonnaise?

Speaker 2:

French fries red and white! By the way, now I really have appetite on it.

Speaker:

appetite: Appetite, hunger, desire. The word was derived from Latin in the 15th century appetiteDesire for food borrowed......

Speaker 2:

Would I really like to eat now? But it also sounds somehow etepetete......

Questions about the text

A chaise longue is ..

1. a bed.

2. a sofa.

3. a chair.

Gallicisms are ...

1. Gallstones.

2. Words of French origin.

3. Villages in Galicia.

Not from French ...

1. Appetite.

2. Canteen.

3rd box

Work order

Box instead of cardboard, leek instead of leek, wallet instead of wallet, tableware instead of service, depression instead of dreariness…. Read the text again very carefully. Write down all the words of French origin that appear in the text. Think about which German words you can use for this.